View full screen - View 1 of Lot 97. EMILE FRIANT | A WOOD-LINE (PORTRAIT OF PÈRE PIDOLE).
97

EMILE FRIANT | A WOOD-LINE (PORTRAIT OF PÈRE PIDOLE)

EMILE FRIANT | A WOOD-LINE (PORTRAIT OF PÈRE PIDOLE)

EMILE FRIANT | A WOOD-LINE (PORTRAIT OF PÈRE PIDOLE)

EMILE FRIANT

Dieuze 1863 - 1932 Nancy

A WOOD-LINE (PORTRAIT OF PÈRE PIDOLE)


Oil on panel; signed and dated lower right E. Friant.85


37 x 46 cm ; 14 1/2 by 18 1/8 in. 


__________________________________________________________________


EMILE FRIANT

Dieuze 1863 - 1932 Nancy

UNE LISIÈRE DE BOIS (PORTRAIT DU PÈRE PIDOLE)


Huile sur panneau ; signé et daté en bas à droite E. Friant.85


37 x 46 cm ; 14 1/2 by 18 1/8 in. 


Due to the various measures taken to deal with the Covid-19 epidemic, property collection and shipment of this lot will be delayed until the offices where it is located are able to reopen. Please refer to the “auction details” tab. Thank you for your understanding

Please contact FRpostsaleservices@sothebys.com for any shipping inquiries.

 

[En raison des circonstances actuelles liées au COVID-19, la livraison de ce lot ne pourra intervenir qu’après la réouverture des locaux de Sotheby’s dans lesquels il se trouve. Nous vous remercions de votre compréhension et nous vous invitons à consulter l’onglet « auction details ».

Pour toute demande concernant le transport, veuillez contacter FRpostsaleservices@sothebys.com.]

Le tableau semble dans un très bel état. Le panneau est biseauté aux quatre bords. Le support semble sain et stable.

La couche picturale semble également en bel état, et ne présenter ni manque, ni soulèvement.

Le vernis est clair.


A la lampe UV

On observe quelques retouches mineures le long du cadre, dues aux frottements du cadre.


Vendu dans un cadre en bois doré.

Veuillez noter que Sotheby's ne garantit pas l'état des cadres.


The painting seems to be in a very nice condition. The panel is beveled on all sides. It seems to be flat and stable.

The painted surface seems to be in a good condition and not to show any loss or uplift.

The varnish layer is clear.


Under UV light

Some minor retouching can be observed along the edges, due to the frame.


Offered with a gilt wood frame.

Please note that Sotheby's does not guarantee the condition of the frame.


(LE LOT EST VENDU TEL QUEL, DANS L'ÉTAT OU IL SE TROUVE AU MOMENT DE LA VENTE EN LIGNE. LE RAPPORT D'ÉTAT FOURNI EN LIGNE EST À TITRE INDICATIF UNIQUEMENT ET A POUR BUT D'AIDER À ÉVALUER L'ÉTAT DU LOT. LES IMAGES DU LOT FONT ÉGALEMENT PARTIE DU RAPPORT DE CONDITION FOURNI PAR SOTHEBY'S. TOUTE RÉFÉRENCE À L'ÉTAT DANS LE RAPPORT DE CONDITION EN LIGNE NE CONSTITUE PAS UNE DESCRIPTION COMPLÈTE DE L'ÉTAT. LE RAPPORT D'ÉTAT EN LIGNE PEUT DÉCRIRE CERTAINES IMPERFECTIONS DU LOT, VOUS DEVEZ CEPENDANT NOTER QUE LE LOT PEUT CONTENIR D'AUTRES DÉFAUTS QUE NE SONT PAS DÉCRITS DANS LE RAPPORT D'ÉTAT DU LOT OU QUI NE SONT PAS VISIBLES SUR LES IMAGES DU LOT LE RAPPORT D'ÉTAT EN LIGNE PEUT NE PAS DÉCRIRE TOUS LES DÉFAUTS D'UN LOT, TELS QUE LES RESTAURATIONS, DÉGRADATIONS, OU ADAPTIONS, CAR SOTHEBY'S N'EST PAS RESTAURATEUR OU CONSERVATEUR PROFESSIONNEL. LE RAPPORT D'ÉTAT EST UNE DESCRIPTION SUBJECTIVE ET QUALIFIÉE EFFECTUÉ PAR SOTHEBY'S (PAR EXEMPLE DES INFORMATIONS SUR LA COULEUR, LA CLARTÉ ET LE POIDS DE PIERRES SONT DES EXPOSÉS D'OPINION SEULEMENT ET NON DES EXPOSÉS DES FAITS EFFECTUÉS PAR SOTHEBY'S). VEUILLEZ ÉGALEMENT NOTER QUE NOUS NE GARANTISSONS PAS ET NE SOMMES PAS RESPONSABLES DES CERTIFICATS DE LABORATOIRES DE GEMMOLOGIE QUI PEUVENT ACCOMPAGNER DES LOTS. DE PLUS CERTAINES IMAGES FOURNIES EN LIGNE PEUVENT NE PAS REFLÉTER L'ÉTAT VÉRITABLE DU LOT (PAR EXEMPLE LES IMAGES EN LIGNE PEUVENT MONTRER DES COULEURS OU OMBRES QUI SONT DIFFÉRENTES DES VÉRITABLES COULEURS ET OMBRES D'UN LOT) C'EST POUR TOUTES CES RAISONS QUE LE RAPPORT DE CONDITION EN LIGNE N'EST PAS UNE ALTERNATIVE AUX CONSEILS PROFESSIONNELS, QUE VOUS POURRIEZ PRENDRE, CONCERNANT L'ÉTAT D'UN LOT. NOS FUTURS ACHETEURS DEVRAIENT SE RÉFÉRER AUX SECTIONS APPROPRIÉES DE NOTRE GUIDE D'ACHAT AUX ENCHÈRES QUI INCLUT DES INFORMATIONS IMPORTANTES SUR LE GENRE DE LOTS VENDUS DANS LA VENTE. NONOBSTANT LE RAPPORT DE CONDITION EN LIGNE OU TOUTES DISCUSSIONS À PROPOS D'UN LOT, TOUS LES LOTS SONT OFFERTS À LA VENTE « EN L'ÉTAT » CONFORMÉMENT À NOS CONDITIONS GÉNÉRALES DE VENTES (EN LIGNE UNIQUEMENT) )


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE

Nancy-Artiste, 25 octobre 1885, no. 34.


Librairie Wiener, Nancy 1885.

We are grateful to the Association Emile Friant who has kindly confirmed the authenticity of this painting, and gave the information on the exhibition and the literature. 


Born in 1863 in a village in the Meurthe, at a young age Emile Friant was enrolled in the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Nancy, where he studied under Théodore Devilly. His gifts were apparent: he exhibited at the local Salon when he was fifteen years old and obtained a scholarship to study in Paris. There, Friant entered Alexandre Cabanel’s studio. An upholder of academism, Cabanel was nevertheless reputed to have an open mind: although he taught his own style, he allowed his young pupils to go their own way as they explored their talents. At the 1880 Salon, Émile Zola described Cabanel’s studio as ‘the school that furnishes naturalism with its recruits’. Émile Friant would indeed subscribe to naturalism, following in the path of Bastien-Lepage, his compatriot from Lorraine, while at the same time he was won over by the approach of the Impressionists, freer than his master’s glacial technique. In 1883, he was awarded the second Grand Prix for Oedipus Cursing his Son Polynices and a few years later he won a gold medal for All Saints’ Day at the 1889 Exposition Universelle. In this work, Friant displays his technical prowess, playing with light variations while not shying away from leaving large areas of black and white. This is also the moment when he establishes himself as a painter of real life – life that is simple but worthy of contemplation.


The painting, exhibited in 1885 and titled Une lisière de bois (a wood-line; on the background, we can recognize the village Bouxières-aux-Dames), shows a fisherman, who can probably be identified as ‘père’ Pidole, whom he had known since his childhood. Elderly caretaker of a lake near Nancy, it is easy to imagine the painter’s heart softening as the old man talked about the lake that none could have cherished more dearly, even though he did not own it. When in 1930 the newspaper L’Est Républicain reported on the conversations between the painter and his model, the journalist could not help but transcribe the simple and sincere love that père Pidole felt for what he described as ‘a pearl from the purest Orient’ – a pearl to which he devoted all his efforts.


In 1904, Friant decided to modify his composition, in accordance with his technique of making alterations based on prints taken from his compositions (ill. 1).


Père Pidole undoubtedly held a place of affection in the artist’s childhood memories, so it is no surprise that he decided to portray him again in a similar setting. This time he is no longer in his boat, but carries a basket and fishing rod slung casually over his shoulder: he is surely returning from the lake for which he is responsible. Presenting an amusing figure, his pose does not seem to have been artificially contrived, but discreetly taken from life. Nature has almost entirely taken over the composition, giving the painter the freedom to play with light in the shadows of the bushes and the bright plain in the background. The brushstroke has become looser, giving a sense of the light breeze that gently ruffles the vegetation.


There is no allegory here, but a work that is surely full of affection for this old man enjoying his familiar pastime, fishing. In the same way as Courbet, Millet and Breton, Friant takes pleasure in depicting this French peasantry, as yet spared from the experience of modern city life. Neglected for a long time in favour of the Italian countryside and Italian models, with the quest for ‘authenticity’ sometimes even leading to staged scenes, rural France attracted a new generation of painters from the middle of the nineteenth century. Seeking to get to the heart of their subject and to the essence of the people who had apparently been forgotten by progress, the naturalist painters strove to get close to real life, a life that did not need to be staged in order to evoke the timelessness of these people who had for so long been disregarded. Pictorial naturalism is expressed here in the social subject, while the symbolism certainly relates to the affection and childlike tenderness that the artist feels for his model.


__________________________________________________________________

Nous remercions l’association Émile Friant qui nous a aimablement confirmé l’authenticité de cette œuvre et communiqué les informations sur l’exposition et la bibliographie. 


Né en 1863 dans un village de la Meurthe, Emile Friant entre tôt à l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Nancy où il étudie auprès de Théodore Devilly. Doué, il expose au Salon local dès l’âge de quinze ans et obtient une bourse d’étude afin de venir étudier à Paris. Là, Friant entre dans l’atelier d’Alexandre Cabanel. Tenant de l’Académisme, le maître est néanmoins réputé ouvert et quoiqu’il enseigne sa manière, il laisse ses jeunes peintres suivre leur propre voie dans l’exploration de leurs talents. Au Salon de 1880, Émile Zola écrit à propos de l’atelier de Cabanel qu’il était « l’Ecole qui fournit au naturalisme ses recrues ». Ce naturalisme, Émile Friant devait l’adopter et se placer dans la lignée de son compatriote lorrain Bastien-Lepage, tandis que de même, il allait se laisser séduire non par la touche glacée de son maître mais par celle plus libre des Impressionnistes. En 1883, il remporte ainsi le second Grand Prix avec Œdipe maudissant son fils Polynice puis une médaille d’or à l’Exposition universelle de 1889 avec La Toussaint. Dans cette œuvre, Friant s’impose comme un grand technicien en jouant des variations de la lumière tandis qu’il n’hésite pas à laisser de grandes plages de blanc et de noir. Par ailleurs, il s’affirme dès lors comme un peintre de la vie réelle, simple mais digne de contemplation.


Le tableau, exposé en 1885 sous le titre Une lisière de bois (l’on voit dans le fond se détacher le village de Bouxières-aux-Dames), met en scène un pécheur dans lequel on doit sans doute reconnaître le père Pidole, personnage connu de son enfance. Vieux gardien d’un étang près de Nancy, nous imaginons le peintre attendri lorsque le vieil homme lui parlait de cet étang qui, bien qu’il ne le possédât pas, n’eût pu trouver personne le chérissant tant. Lorsque L’Est Républicain rapporte les échanges entre le peintre et son modèle en 1930, le journaliste ne peut s’empêcher de retranscrire l’amour simple et sincère que le père Pidole porte à ce qu’il nomme une « perle du plus pur Orient », perle à laquelle il porte tous les égards.


En 1904, Friant choisit de retoucher sa composition selon sa technique de repentir grâce aux épreuves tirées de ses compositions (ill. 1). Personnage sans doute cher à ses souvenirs d’enfant, il n’est pas étonnant que le peintre décide de le représenter une nouvelle fois et dans des circonstances similaires.


Non plus dans sa barque mais une canne à pêche nonchalamment jetée sur son épaule, son panier sous le bras, le père Pidole s’en revient sûrement de l’étang dont il avait la garde. Figure amusante, le vieil homme apparaît comme un modèle dont la pose ne semble pas avoir été contrainte mais discrètement saisie sur le vif. La nature a presqu’entièrement gagné notre composition, laissant au peintre la liberté de jouer avec une lumière à l’ombre des buissons et brillante dans la plaine en arrière-plan. Le pinceau se fait plus libre et nous offre à sentir la brise légère qui agite délicatement la végétation.


Ici, nulle allégorie mais une œuvre sans doute pleine d’affection pour ce vieil homme s’adonnant à son plaisir habituel de la pêche. A l’instar de ce qu’avaient pu faire Courbet, Millet ou Breton, Friant se plaît à représenter ce peuple paysan français encore épargné par la modernité de la ville. Longtemps délaissée pour une campagne et des modèles italiens, ce parfois jusqu’à une mise en scène en quête d’« authenticité », la ruralité de notre pays attire une nouvelle génération de peintres dès la moitié du XIXe siècle. Souhaitant aller au cœur du sujet, au cœur de l’incarnation d’un peuple que le progrès semble avoir oublié, les peintres naturalistes désirent se rapprocher de la vie véritable, de celle qui n’a pas besoin de mise en scène pour incarner le peuple et son intemporalité longtemps mise de côté. Le naturalisme pictural s’exprime ici dans le sujet social tandis que le symbole se rapporte certainement à l’affect du peintre et la tendresse d’enfant qu’il a pour son modèle.


Ill. 1, Emile Friant, Le pêcheur, inv. 2006.2.9.(39), Nancy, Musée des Beaux-Arts © Ville de Nancy, cliché P. Buren.