View full screen - View 1 of Lot 20. Jalisco Joined Couple, Ameca-Etzatlán Style, Protoclassic, circa 100 BC - AD 250.
20

Jalisco Joined Couple, Ameca-Etzatlán Style, Protoclassic, circa 100 BC - AD 250

Estimate:

40,000 - 60,000 USD

Property from the Estate of Patsy R. Taylor

Jalisco Joined Couple, Ameca-Etzatlán Style, Protoclassic, circa 100 BC - AD 250

Jalisco Joined Couple, Ameca-Etzatlán Style, Protoclassic, circa 100 BC - AD 250

Estimate:

40,000 - 60,000 USD

Property from the Estate of Patsy R. Taylor

Jalisco Joined Couple, Ameca-Etzatlán Style

Protoclassic, circa 100 BC - AD 250


Height: 14 1/2 in (36.8 cm); Width: 13 3/4 in (35 cm)

Overall excellent condition. Beautiful patina, coloring and modelling. Some small areas of apparent repair. Tip of the proper left side of female's nose shows some inpainting. Her left hand holding the bowl has some areas of inpainting on the backside. Some fingers appear repainted on the male figure's proper right hand and some fill to the rim of the cup. Areas of general incrustation still remaining on parts of the head, body, and clothing. 


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

Gordon Schmidt
Gray and Patsy R. Taylor, Greenwich, acquired from the above on March 3, 1971
Richard F. Townsend, ed., Ancient West Mexico: Art and Archaeology of the Unknown Past, Chicago, 1998, p. 129, fig. 32, cat. no. 129
The Bruce Museum, Greenwich, Life, Death and the Afterlife in Ancient Mexico, April 19 - November 3, 1991
The Art Institute of Chicago, Ancient West Mexico: Art and Archaeology of the Unknown Past, September 5, 1998 - November 22, 1998; additional venue: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, December 20, 1998 - March 29, 1999
One of the outstanding sculptures in the Taylor collection is the Jalisco joined "loving couple". He leans off-balance towards his female companion, his left arm wrapped across her back, and offers her a small cup in his raised right hand. Her hand on his knee acknowledges the gesture, but she looks outward, holding a shallow bowl close to her chest. Both figures are modestly clothed with minimal jewelry and simple turban headdresses.

As characteristically modeled in this Ameca style, the elongated faces are nearly identical; these shared features reinforce a bond of social identities and clan lineages. They each have long heavy cheekbones, sharp jawlines, and parted lips showing clearly delineated teeth. Their slender noses are adorned with rings and the wide oval rimmed eyes are accented by dark eye masks. The female’s breasts have painted tattoos of swirling patterns, and their fingernails are carefully modeled.

The paired male and female figures are an important genre of the ancient West Mexican sculptures, fortifying and honoring the ancestral lineages, either as the mythic founding couple, or as an ancestral sibling pair. Kristi Butterwick notes that ancestors were essential players in day to day life, and the sculptures  "[...] are embodiments of the tales of the ancestors handed down by generations of their kin." (Kristi Butterwick, The Heritage of Power: Ancient Sculpture from West Mexico, the Andrall E. Pearson Family Collection, New York, 2004, pp. 32-33).