View full screen - View 1 of Lot 2. Two Imperial Fabergé gold and gunmetal pendants, the shield pendant, workmaster Michael Perchin, St Petersburg, circa 1894.
2

Two Imperial Fabergé gold and gunmetal pendants, the shield pendant, workmaster Michael Perchin, St Petersburg, circa 1894

VAT reduced rate

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 GBP

Property from a Distinguished Private Collection

Two Imperial Fabergé gold and gunmetal pendants, the shield pendant, workmaster Michael Perchin, St Petersburg, circa 1894

Two Imperial Fabergé gold and gunmetal pendants, the shield pendant, workmaster Michael Perchin, St Petersburg, circa 1894

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 GBP

Lot sold:

17,640

GBP

Property from a Distinguished Private Collection

Two Imperial Fabergé gold and gunmetal pendants, the shield pendant, workmaster Michael Perchin, St Petersburg, circa 1894


both decorated with the crowned monogram of Emperor Alexander III (1845-1894) in rose gold, the shield pendant inscribed in Russian with the date and time of the Emperor's death '20 October 1894, 2h15m', struck on the loops with workmaster’s initials, 56 standard

2

height of the egg including loop 2.3cm, 1in., of the shield including loop 3.1cm, 1.2 in.

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact helen.culversmith@sothebys.com

Presented to Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna (1875-1906) by her aunt, Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna the Elder (1854-1920)
Prince Andrei Alexandrovich (1897-1981)
Princess Olga Andreevna (b. 1950)
A La Vieille Russie, New York

The present pendants are rare and historically important objects, offering insight into the private lives of the Imperial family. The present lot belonged the Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna (1875-1960), the eldest daughter of Tsar Alexander III and her records show that these were received from her Aunt Michen, Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna the Elder (1854-1920). Following the Death of Emperor Alexander III, it has been suggested that Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna the Elder wore this egg herself. Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna recorded this egg pendant in her inventory of Easter eggs, a collection of descriptions and watercolour illustrations of Easter eggs and other smaller pieces of jewelry that she acquired between 1880-1905, totaling 499 pieces. The inventory page is illustrated in the 2002 exhibition catalogue, O. Krog, et al. Treasures of Russia – Imperial Gifts, Amalienborg Palace, Denmark.


Prince Andrei Alexandrovich inherited the pendants from his mother Xenia and in turn gave them to his daughter Princess Olga Andreevna. Princess Olga confirms their provenance in a letter dated 15 May 2005. The provenance and personal significance of this gunmetal egg, a private commission, intended to comfort the grieving family of Emperor Alexander III make it a rare and important pendant in Fabergé’s oeuvre.