View full screen - View 1 of Lot 246. A silver and cloisonné enamel triptych icon, Ivan Khlebnikov, Moscow, 1877.
246

A silver and cloisonné enamel triptych icon, Ivan Khlebnikov, Moscow, 1877

Estimate:

15,000

to
- 25,000 GBP

A silver and cloisonné enamel triptych icon, Ivan Khlebnikov, Moscow, 1877

A silver and cloisonné enamel triptych icon, Ivan Khlebnikov, Moscow, 1877

Estimate:

15,000

to
- 25,000 GBP

A silver and cloisonné enamel triptych icon, Ivan Khlebnikov, Moscow, 1877


flanked by icons of St Alexander Nevsky and St Nicholas the Miracle Worker within ornate borders, the hinged doors engraved with foliate ornament centering a cross, the back engraved with coat-of-arms and inscription in Russian 'In memory of 27 June 1879/Lord fight those fighting me / St Petersburg, 1880, 11 March/ Stancho Dmitri', struck on the reverse Khlebnikov in Cyrillic beneath the Imperial warrant, 84 standard, the side panels struck with workmaster's initials KH in Cyrillic, Moscow, 84 standard

14 by 18.3cm, 5 1/2 by 7 1/5in.

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact helen.culversmith@sothebys.com

Engraved with the Coat of Arms of the House of Battenberg, the present lot most likely belonged to Prince Alexander of Battenberg (1857-1893), the first prince of Bulgaria and commemorates his ascension to the throne.


Prince Alexander, or 'Sandro' or 'Drino' as he was known in the family, was the nephew of Emperor Alexander II while his mother had been lady-in-waiting to Tsaritsa Maria Alexandrovna. At an early age, Alexander frequently visited Saint Petersburg, and often accompanied his Russian uncle, who was very fond of his nephew, during the Russo-Turkish War (1877-1878). There, the Prince distinguished himself in battle and was awarded the Order of St George 4th class.


After the War, when Bulgaria became an autonomous principality under the suzerainty of the Ottoman Empire, the Emperor recommended his nephew to the Bulgarians as a candidate for the new throne. On 26 June 1879 of the Julian calendar, Prince Alexander was unanimously elected by the Grand National Assembly as Prince of Bulgaria and the 27th June 1879 marked his first day as ruler of Bulgaria. The Prince’s reign was short-lived however as he found himself caught between the Russians, internal quarrels amongst Bulgarian politicians and a growing Austro-Hungarian influence. In the night of 20 August 1886 conspirators organized a coup and Prince Alexander was forced to abdicate.