View full screen - View 1 of Lot 4. A LARGE CARVED RED EGYPTIAN PORPHYRY VASE WITH COVER, LOUIS XIV, PROBABLY EXECUTED IN ROME, CIRCA 1680-1700 | GRAND VASE COUVERT EN PORPHYRE ROUGE D'EGYPTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, PROBABLEMENT RÉALISÉ À ROME, VERS 1680-1700.
4

A LARGE CARVED RED EGYPTIAN PORPHYRY VASE WITH COVER, LOUIS XIV, PROBABLY EXECUTED IN ROME, CIRCA 1680-1700 | GRAND VASE COUVERT EN PORPHYRE ROUGE D'EGYPTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, PROBABLEMENT RÉALISÉ À ROME, VERS 1680-1700

Estimate:

80,000

to
- 120,000 EUR

A LARGE CARVED RED EGYPTIAN PORPHYRY VASE WITH COVER, LOUIS XIV, PROBABLY EXECUTED IN ROME, CIRCA 1680-1700 | GRAND VASE COUVERT EN PORPHYRE ROUGE D'EGYPTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, PROBABLEMENT RÉALISÉ À ROME, VERS 1680-1700

A LARGE CARVED RED EGYPTIAN PORPHYRY VASE WITH COVER, LOUIS XIV, PROBABLY EXECUTED IN ROME, CIRCA 1680-1700 | GRAND VASE COUVERT EN PORPHYRE ROUGE D'EGYPTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, PROBABLEMENT RÉALISÉ À ROME, VERS 1680-1700

Estimate:

80,000

to
- 120,000 EUR

Lot sold:

200,000

EUR

A LARGE CARVED RED EGYPTIAN PORPHYRY VASE WITH COVER, LOUIS XIV, PROBABLY EXECUTED IN ROME, CIRCA 1680-1700


the concave gadrooned lid surmounted by a dolphin, above a gadrooned body on a socle


Haut. 59 cm, larg. 47 cm, prof. 25 cm ; height 23¼ in; width 18½ in; depth 9¾ in


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

GRAND VASE COUVERT EN PORPHYRE ROUGE D'EGYPTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, PROBABLEMENT RÉALISÉ À ROME, VERS 1680-1700


le couvercle et la panse à décor de godrons, la prise en forme de dauphin

The porphyre has an homogeneous color on all parts.

Due to age there are some chips in different places. Minor overall and one wider on the upper part of the collar, moving through the body. They have been restored (filled in with powder) but the color has changed to dark brownish (visible on images). It should be considered to have them remade. The patina is soft and touching aspect is smooth. Impressive object.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Purchased in Paris by the coachbuilder Arreiter for the King of Spain Charles IV and delivered in Madrid in 1802;

Collection of the Marquis de Biron, Galerie Georges Petit, Paris, 9th-11th June 1914, Lot 376;

Collection of the Duke de Talleyrand;

Anonymous sale, Etude Couturier Nicolay, Paris, 19th November 1981, Lot 200;

The Keck Collection, California, Sotheby's, New York, 5th December 1991, Lot 48


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Achetée à Paris par le carrossier Arreiter pour le roi Charles IV d’Espagne et livrée à Madrid en 1802

Collection du marquis de Biron, vente à Paris, Galerie Georges Petit, les 9-11 juin 1914, lot 376 (attribuées au bronzier Forestier dans le catalogue)

Collection du duc de Talleyrand

Vente à Paris, Mes Couturier & Nicolaÿ, hôtel Drouot, le 19 novembre 1981, lot 200

Collection Keck, Bel Air, Californie puis vente chez Sotheby’s à New York, le 5 décembre 1991, lot 48

C. Huchet de Quénetain, Les Styles Consulat et Empire, Paris, 2005, p. 159 (ill.)


Literature References


D. Alcouffe, « Le style Charles IV » in Styles Meubles Décors du Louis XVI à nos jours, Paris, 1972

Juan José Junquera Y Mato, « Muebles Franceses en Los Palacios Reales » in Reales Sitios, N°43, first trimester 1975

F. Duret-Robert, « L'un des créateurs du néo-classicisme, Jean-Démonsthène Dugourc » in Connaissance des Arts, May 1988

Isabel Morales Vallespin , « Proyectos Arquitectonico de Dugourc paro el futuro Carlos IV » in Reales Sitios, n° 100, 1989

José Luis Sancho, « Pryetos de Dugourc para decoraciones arquitectonicas en las casitas de El Pardo y el Escurial » in Reales Sitios, n° 101 & 102, 1989

C. Baulez, « Les imaginations de Dugourc » in Versailles, deux siècles d'histoire de l'art, 2007

C. Gastinel-Coural, « Du nouveau sur les ornemanistes français à la fin du XVIIIe siècle. À propos du Palais d'Albe », in L'Estampille, décembre 1990


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

C. Huchet de Quénetain, Les Styles Consulat et Empire, Paris, 2005, p. 159 (ill.)


Références Bibliographiques


D. Alcouffe, « Le style Charles IV » in Styles Meubles Décors du Louis XVI à nos jours, Paris, 1972

Juan José Junquera Y Mato, « Muebles Franceses en Los Palacios Reales » in Reales Sitios, N°43, premier trimestre 1975

F. Duret-Robert, « L’un des créateurs du néo-classicisme, Jean-Démonsthène Dugourc » in Connaissance des Arts, mai 1988

Isabel Morales Vallespin , « Proyectos Arquitectonico de Dugourc paro el futuro Carlos IV » in Reales Sitios, n° 100, 1989

José Luis Sancho, « Pryetos de Dugourc para decoraciones arquitectonicas en las casitas de El Pardo y el Escurial » in Reales Sitios, n° 101 & 102, 1989

C. Baulez, « Les imaginations de Dugourc » in Versailles, deux siècles d’histoire de l’art, 2007

C. Gastinel-Coural, « Du nouveau sur les ornemanistes français à la fin du XVIIIe siècle. À propos du Palais d'Albe », in L'Estampille, décembre 1990

The work of F. Forestier on the designs for the Robert de Cotte Collection and the exhibition devoted to prophyry, which took place at the Louvre Museum from 2003 – 2004, highlighted the vast campaign of orders orchestrated in Rome by the Superintendent of Buildings for the King at the end of the 17th century.


Father Benedetti (circa 1610 – 1690), the Roman agent to Cardinal Mazarin, at first served as an intermediary, but then became the direct agent to the King of France after Cardinal Mazarin died. Drawings by his hand tell us about different types of porphyry vases (models and dimensions) which were either already available, or indeed ordered in Rome for French customers, with the acquisition of porphyry vases in Italy seemingly to have benefited the cardinals Richelieu and Mazarin, before enriching the collections of Louis XIV. During the second half of the 17th century, correspondence attests to the large amount of purchases of prophyry vases intended for the French Royal collections.


Other drawings also kept in the Robert de Cotte collection at the Cabinet des Estampes show projects for vases, some of which were produced. Through these, one can observe the evolution of traditional forms and models, where the relative repetitiveness of the repertoire is enriched with fantasy, thereby changing the typical Roman production to that more suited to the French taste. With the form of gadrooning twisted or straight, in relief or hollow, we see the appearance of animal forms on the handles, (heads of lions, rams, snakes, dolphins and dragons) even though at times the realisation of these carved forms are naive. Also noticeable are the very ambitious projects imagined on paper, but in reality produced in a much simpler way: the griffin which was to adorn a vase, became a dog; the annotation on the project indicates « we changed the griffin into a dog, the latter cleaner to polish into a porphyry vase", (Item No 50 at the exhibition at the Louvre Museum).


A relatively large number of these vases were intended to decorate the Palace of Versailles, but were seized during the Revolution and transported to the Central Museum (Louvre) and thus preserved. Several of these were a prominent feature in the Porphyry exhibition at the Louvre between 2003 and 2004. In this exhibition, a porphyry vase with handles in the shape of a dolphin was presented (catalogue number 52 and in the collection of Louvre inv. MR2842). This vase was acquired in Rome in 1685, before being inventoried in the War Room at the Palace of Versailles in 1722. Here the carving of the dolphins are treated in a fairly naive manner, with large round eyes, a mouth that evokes a beak and long tapered fins and comparable with the dolphin that adorns the lid of our vase. Several other porphyry vases with handles in the shape of dolphins are mentioned in the General Inventory of Sculpture drawn up in 1707:


- Two porphyry vases with lids adorned with double dolphin handles, at a height of eighteen inches, including the lid;


-Two porphyry vases in three pieces, their lids adorned with a rotating gadrooned pattern, the body with rotating gadroons and grooves, the foot decorated with leaves, with dolphin handles, at a height of nineteen inches in all;


-A three-piece vase, the body adorned with swirling gadroons, the bottom with grooves, the handles with two dolphins, at a height of twenty inches.


The Palace of Versailles, in particular the Hall of Mirrors and the War and Peace Room, housed a remarkable collection of porphyry vases and busts, completing the creation of a luxurious atmosphere and symbol of power not equalled in other European Courts. The interest in porphyry prevailed throughout the 18th century and important collectors like Crozat owned a large oval vase with dolphin heads. It was due to the classical revival and a return to the taste for the Louis XIV style that allowed for a natural resurgence in the interest of porphyry works of art during the second half of the century.


The great collectors of this period, amongst others the nobleman marquis de Marigny and the financier Pierre Paul Louis Randon de Boisset, were eager to obtain such pieces and with the discovery of the quarries in France, the progress in the art of the size of the pieces and the impetus given by the Duc d’Aumont, made France less dependent on the marble resources of Italy.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Les travaux de F. Forestier sur les dessins du fonds Robert de Cotte, ainsi que l’exposition consacrée au porphyre qui s’est déroulée au Louvre en 2003-2004, a permis de mettre en lumière la vaste campagne de commandes orchestrée par la Surintendance des Bâtiments du Roi à la fin du XVIIe siècle à Rome.


Tout d’abord l’abbé Benedetti (vers 1610-1690), agent romain du cardinal Mazarin, servit d’intermédiaire et devint à la mort de ce dernier l’agent du roi de France. Des dessins de sa main nous renseignent sur différents types de vases en porphyre (modèles et dimensions) qui étaient disponibles ou commandés à Rome pour une clientèle française. Les acquisitions de vases en porphyre en Italie ont semble-t-il particulièrement profité aux cardinaux Richelieu et Mazarin, avant d’enrichir les collections de Louis XIV. Dans la seconde moitié du XVIIe siècle, de nombreuses correspondances attestent d’achats massifs de vases en porphyre destinés à enrichir les collections royales françaises.


D’autres dessins également conservés dans le fonds Robert de Cotte au Cabinet des Estampes montrent des projets de vases et parfois leurs réalisations. On peut ainsi observer une évolution des formes et des modèles traditionnels où la relative répétitivité du répertoire s’enrichit de fantaisie imprimant ainsi une volonté de se démarquer d’une production typiquement romaine et plus adaptée au goût français. Si les canaux, les godrons tors ou droits, en relief ou en creux, et les oves sont toujours très présents, on voit également apparaître des formes animales sur les anses (têtes de lion et de béliers, serpents, dauphins, dragons), la réalisation étant parfois assez naïve, peut-être liée à un manque de pratique. On peut remarquer que des projets probablement trop ambitieux, en tout cas imaginés sur le papier, sont transformés en réalisations plus simples : le griffon qui devait orner un vase s’est mué en chien et l’annotation sur le projet indique que « l’on a changé le griffon en chien, la dernière figure estant plus propre a polir en porphire » (il s’agit du n° 50 de l’exposition au Louvre).


Un nombre relativement important de ces vases fut destiné à décorer le château de Versailles où ils furent saisis à la Révolution puis transportés au Museum central (Louvre) ; plusieurs ont pu ainsi être préservés. Ils figurèrent en bonne place dans l’exposition au Louvre sur le Porphyre en 2003-2004. Dans cette exposition fut présenté un vase en porphyre avec des anses en forme de dauphin (n° 52 du catalogue et conservé au Louvre inv. MR2842). Ce vase fut acquis à Rome en 1685 avant d’être inventorié en 1722 dans le salon de la Guerre du château de Versailles. Les dauphins, traités de manière assez naïve, avec de gros yeux ronds, une bouche qui évoque davantage un bec et de longues nageoires effilées, sont évidemment à comparer avec le dauphin qui orne le couvercle de notre vase.


Plusieurs autres vases en porphyre avec des anses en forme de dauphins sont mentionnés dans l’Inventaire Général des Sculptures dressé en 1707:


-Deux vazes de porphire uny avec des couvercles ornez de testes de dauphins doubles pour anses, ayant de hauteur dix-huit pouces y compris le couvercle


- Deux vazes de porphire en trois morceaux avec leurs couvercles, ornez d’un godron tournant avec un bouton gaudronné au dessus, le corps entouré de cannaux tournants, et le dessous de gaudrons et de cannelures, le pied est orné de feuilles d’eau, et pour les anses deux dauphins, ayant de hauteur en tout dix-neuf pouces


-Un vase en trois morceau orné de gaudrons tournans sur le corps du vaze et sur le bas des cannelures gaudronnées, ayant pour anses deux dauphins et de hauteur vingt pouces.


Le château de Versailles - plus particulièrement la galerie des Glaces, les salons de la Guerre et de la Paix - abritait une remarquable collection de vases et bustes en porphyre qui ne trouvait pas d’égal dans les différentes cours européennes, et achevait de créer une atmosphère luxueuse, mais aussi symbole de puissance.


Ce goût pour le porphyre s’est maintenu pendant tout le XVIIIe siècle. Les amateurs célèbres recherchaient des objets d’art en porphyre et Crozat possédait un grand vase ovale à têtes de dauphins. Une résurgence de cet attrait, liée au renouveau classique et au retour à un style louis-quartorzien dans la seconde moitié du siècle, se développa naturellement. Les grands collectionneurs de cette période - Marigny, Randon de Boisset - étaient avides de telles pièces. La découverte de carrières en France, les progrès dans l’art de la taille et l’impulsion donnée par le duc d’Aumont, rendirent la France moins tributaire des ressources marbrières de l’Italie.