View full screen - View 1 of Lot 10. A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED PATINATED BRONZE RHINOCEROS 'CORNE VERTE' MUSICAL TABLE CLOCK, LOUIS XV, BY JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN, CIRCA, 1750 | PENDULE À MUSIQUE AU RHINOCÉROS EN BRONZE PATINÉ, DORÉ ET CORNE VERTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XV, VERS 1750, PAR JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN.
10

A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED PATINATED BRONZE RHINOCEROS 'CORNE VERTE' MUSICAL TABLE CLOCK, LOUIS XV, BY JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN, CIRCA, 1750 | PENDULE À MUSIQUE AU RHINOCÉROS EN BRONZE PATINÉ, DORÉ ET CORNE VERTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XV, VERS 1750, PAR JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN

Estimate:

150,000

to
- 350,000 EUR

9

10

11

A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED PATINATED BRONZE RHINOCEROS 'CORNE VERTE' MUSICAL TABLE CLOCK, LOUIS XV, BY JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN, CIRCA, 1750 | PENDULE À MUSIQUE AU RHINOCÉROS EN BRONZE PATINÉ, DORÉ ET CORNE VERTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XV, VERS 1750, PAR JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN

A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED PATINATED BRONZE RHINOCEROS 'CORNE VERTE' MUSICAL TABLE CLOCK, LOUIS XV, BY JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN, CIRCA, 1750 | PENDULE À MUSIQUE AU RHINOCÉROS EN BRONZE PATINÉ, DORÉ ET CORNE VERTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XV, VERS 1750, PAR JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN

Estimate:

150,000

to
- 350,000 EUR

Lot sold:

492,500

EUR

A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED PATINATED BRONZE RHINOCEROS 'CORNE VERTE' MUSICAL TABLE CLOCK, LOUIS XV, BY JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN, CIRCA, 1750


6¾-inch enamel dial signed Gille l'Ainé A Paris, the similarly signed movement numbered 1028, with silk suspension and numbered outside count wheel striking on a bell, a further lever activating the musical movement at the hour, the drum surmounted by a seated boy in Indian dress with quiver and arrow, all mounted on the back of a realistically modelled rhinoceros standing on a voluted base cast with foliate scrolls and rockwork, signed to the rear ST. GERMAIN, the whole raised on a bombé case containing the fusee musical movement, signed as the clock and comprising a pinned brass cylinder playing a selection of tunes on a carillon of thirteen bells with twenty three hammers, triggered on the hour by the clock or at will by a lever to the front, the case veneered with panels of green-stained horn divided by inlaid scrolls, the front, sides and rear with gilt-bronze framed trellis fret panels, the front and rear hinged for access, gadrooned borders and scrolled corners terminating in scrolled feet


Haut. 83 cm, larg. 50 cm, prof. 23 cm ; height 32⅔ in; width 19⅔ in; depth 9 in


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

PENDULE À MUSIQUE AU RHINOCÉROS EN BRONZE PATINÉ, DORÉ ET CORNE VERTE D'ÉPOQUE LOUIS XV, VERS 1750, PAR JEAN-JOSEPH DE SAINT-GERMAIN


le cadran et le mouvement signés Gille l'Ainé A Paris, le mouvement numéroté N°1028, la caisse surmontée d'un jeune indien et supportée par un rhinocéros sur une terrasse rocaille signée à l'arrière ST. GERMAIN ; le socle plaqué de corne teintée vert, contenant un mécanisme musical à carilllon de treize cloches et vingt-trois marteaux, activé par la pendule ou par un levier

Good overall condition. Improved model. The rhino with a fine patina.

The giltbronze with a very good chasing and attractive mercury gilding. It has been cleaned and show some expected wear particularly to the flat surfaces of the clock box. The green stained horn base in good condition.

The green color refreshed in the past (prior to 1982). The musical movement is complete and in working condition nevertheless a checking and cleaning is always advised. The front gilt bronze cartouche previously with a lock (now removed) and fixed with a screw.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Collection of Monsieur le Comte de Beaussier, sold Hotel Drouot, Paris, 7th-9th May 1919, Lot 177;

Collection of Florence Gould, sold Sotheby's Monaco, 24th-25th June 1984, Lot 704;

Galerie Jean-Marie Rossi - Aveline, Paris, Biennale 1984;

American Private Collection, Sotheby's, New York, 3rd December 1989, Lot 44


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Collection du comte de Beaussier, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 7-9 mai 1919, lot 177

Collection de Florence J. Gould, villa El Patio, Cannes, puis vente de sa collection, Sotheby’s, Monaco, vol. II, les 24-25 juin 1984, lot 704

Galerie Jean-Marie Rossi - Aveline, Paris, Biennale 1984

Collection privée américaine, Sotheby’s, New York, le 3 décembre 1989, lot 44





Sotheby’s à Monaco, 10 ans, 1975-1985, Paris, 1986

J-D. Augarde, Les Ouvriers du Temps, Genève, 1996, ill. p. 156


Related literature 


Oudry's Painted Menagerie, exhibition catalogue at the J. Paul Getty Museum, 2007

D. Alcouffe et al., Les bronzes d'ameublement du Louvre, Dijon, 2004, n° 34, p. 78

J-D. Augarde, « Jean-Joseph de Saint-Germain, Bronzier », L'Estampille, December 1996


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sotheby’s à Monaco, 10 ans, 1975-1985, Paris, 1986

J-D. Augarde, Les Ouvriers du Temps, Genève, 1996, ill. p. 156


Références bibliographiques 


Oudry's Painted Menagerie, cat. expo J. Paul Getty Museum, 2007

D. Alcouffe et al., Les bronzes d'ameublement du Louvre, Dijon, 2004, n° 34, p. 78

J-D. Augarde, « Jean-Joseph de Saint-Germain, Bronzier », L'Estampille, December 1996

This bronze rhinoceros was sculpted after the most famous living model of the time, a female rhinoceros originally from India, named Clara. She was the fifth rhinoceros to arrive in Europe and the second to earn international celebrity status, the first being the famous rhinoceros engraved by Dürer in 1515.


The one year old rhinoceros was collected by Jan Albert Sichterman, the Bengal Director of the Dutch East India Comany (VOC) and he named her Clara as she arrived in Rotterdam on 22 July, 1741 and was immediately exposed to the public. The success of these exhibitions prompted her owner to undertake a European tour. A special vehicle was built to accommodate her on the long journeys by road and the tour proved to be a tremendous success. Clara was exhibited in Brussels in 1743, then in Hamburg in 1744, but the tour only officially began during the spring of 1746 in Hanover and Berlin, where on 26th April she was presented to King Frederick II of Prussia. Clara then travelled to Frankfurt-on-the-Oder, Breslau, and finally Vienna, where she made a triumphal entry escorted by eight plumed guards. In 1747 she went to Munich, Regensburg, Freiberg and Dresden where she posed for Johann Joachim Kaendler of the Meissen porcelain factory. In July she was invited by Frederick II, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel and accommodated at the Orangery at Kassel castle. In November she was in Mannheim, at the Auberge du Paon and in December she was in Strasbourg for the Christmas Fair. In 1748 she was presented in Bern, Zurich, Basel, Stuttgart, Augsburg, Nuremberg and Würzburg, whereafter she travelled to France. In December 1748, she was in Reims and in January 1749 she was received by King Louis XV at the Royal Menagerie at Versailles. From February onwards she spent five months in Paris in the barracks at the Saint-Germain fair in rue des Quatre-Vents, where she was sketched by Jean-Baptiste Oudry and served as a model for the famous life-size painting now kept at the Staatliches Museum in Schwerin.


Clara's popularity and the success of the tour was extraordinary and bordered on frenzy. Books, epigrams and even a lyrical poem was published about her and so the fashion for “rhinoceros” ornament began.  The life-sized rhinoceros by Jean-Baptiste Oudry became one of the main attractions at the 1750 Salon and served as a model for the Natural History engravings by Georges-Louis Marie Leclerc, Comte de Buffon. She was certainly a source of inspiration for merchants and craftsmen. At the end of 1749, Clara embarked on a journey from Marseilles to tour Italy. Passing through Verona, she returned to Vienna and reached London at the end of that year, where she was admired by the British Royal family. Little is known of her travels during the period between 1752 and 1758, except that she travelled to Prague, Warsaw, Krakow and returned to Breslau in 1754 and Copenhagen in 1755. Clara returned to London in 1758, where she died.


There are three known interpretations of rhinoceros present on clocks:

The first, inspired directly from the engraving by Dürer where the animal has a second horn on the shoulder, is seen on the musical clock sold at Sotheby’s in London, Treasures, July 3, 2019, lot 16. The second seems to be a bronze interpretation of the model originally made in porcelain by Kaendler for the Meissen factory (see P. Pröschel et al. Vergoldete Bronzen, vol. II, p. 525, fig. 2), which also appears in a portrait of the Princess of Parma, painted by Laurent Pécheux in 1765 and kept at the Pitti Palace in Florence. The third, naturally realistic enough, could have been directly inspired by the extensively "studied" Clara. It is this model that is present on our clock and of which Saint-Germain produced several versions with slight variations (surmounted by Indian figures or cherubs) and which was also produced by various other clockmakers, with the rhinoceros supporting the dial, or with the rhinoceros on an imposing and richly decorated box containing a musical mechanism.


Among the rhinoceros musical clocks signed, or attributed to the bronzier Jean-Joseph de Saint-Germain it is worth mentioning:

-From the Collection of Antenor Patiño, the Mes Ader Picard Tajan sale, Palais Galliera, Paris on November 26, 1975, lot 83, a clock, the dial signed Louis Montjoye, above a rhinoceros in gilt-bronze, on a base in veneered wood;

-A clock in the Louvre museum (inv. OA 10540), the movement signed, Viger, the base in brown tortoiseshell;

-From the Jaime-Ortiz Patiño Collection, Sotheby’s New York sale, May 20, 1992, lot 8, the movement attributed to Gudin, the base veneered in red stained horn;

-A clock sold at Christie’s in London, July 6, 2006, lot 151, the movement attributed to Dutertre, the base veneered in green stained horn;

-A clock sold, Sotheby’s London, Treasures sale, 3 July, 2019, lot 16, the movement attributed to Gudin, the lacquered wood base imitating brown tortoiseshell.


Jean-Joseph de Saint-Germain (1719-1791) designed a large number of clocks, the dials of which were supported by different animals, i.e. an elephant, bull, lion, wild boar or rhinoceros. A commercial prospectus produced after he established his business at rue Saint-Nicolas shows the extent of his production and activity: “Saint-Germain, master in chasing, modelling and founding, makes and sells all kinds of boxes and bases in tortoiseshel, gold, bronze, cabinet fittings, fire irons, grills, chandeliers, girandoles, pendulum bases, cartel clocks of all kinds, elephant, lion, bull and other wax models, all at a fair price”. In the inventory after the death of his first wife in 1747, there is imention of “two rhinoceros clocks, one to be modelled, the other completed, together for the sum of 140 l”.  The rhinoceros clocks were much favoured by the French Royal family, one was in Marie-Antoinette’s rooms at the Tuileries, “pendulum carried by a rhinoceros posing on an ormolu gilded base, the animal carrying on its back a drum in which the striking movement has the name JB Baillon” (E. Lery, Les pendules de Marie-Antoinette, Revue del’Histoire de Versailles et de Seine et Oise, 1931). Another “carillon pendulum representing a rhinoceros supporting the clock and placed on a plated cabinet base (in green horn) and furnished with gilded bronze” was at Saint-Cloud (AN, O/1/3371).


Pierre ler Gille dit Gille l’Ainé, whose signature is on the enamel dial, clock movement and musical movement of our clock, received master watchmaker in 1746. He worked for Augustus II of Saxony and used cases made by the great cabinetmakers and bronziers of the time.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ce rhinocéros en bronze fut très vraisemblablement ciselé d’après le plus fameux modèle vivant de l’époque, un rhinocéros femelle en provenance d’Inde nommé Clara, cinquième rhinocéros à parvenir vivant dans l'Europe moderne, et le second à gagner une célébrité internationale que l’on ne peut comparer qu'à celle du rhinocéros de 1515 gravé par Dürer.


Âgé d'un an, l’animal avait été recueilli par Jan Albert Sichterman, directeur au Bengale de la Compagnie néerlandaise des Indes orientales (VOC). Il l'appela Clara. Elle débarqua à Rotterdam le 22 juillet 1741 et fut immédiatement exposée au public. Le succès rencontré par ces expositions incita son propriétaire à entreprendre une tournée européenne. On lui construisit un véhicule spécial adapté aux longues étapes terrestres, et la tournée rencontra un succès prodigieux. Clara fut exposée à Bruxelles dès 1743, puis à Hambourg en 1744. La tournée débuta véritablement au printemps 1746 : Hanovre, puis Berlin. Le 26 avril, le roi Frédéric II de Prusse vint la voir. Puis ce fut Francfort-sur-l'Oder, Breslau, et enfin Vienne, où elle fit une entrée triomphale escortée de huit gardes empanachés. En 1747, elle passa à Munich, Ratisbonne, Freiberg et Dresde où elle posa pour Johann Joachim Kaendler de la Manufacture de porcelaine de Meissen. En juillet, elle fut hébergée à l'orangerie du château de Kassel, invitée par le Landgrave Frédéric II de Hesse. En novembre, elle était à Mannheim, à l'Auberge du Paon ; en décembre elle se trouvait à Strasbourg pour la Foire de Noël. En 1748, elle fut présentée à Berne, Zurich, Bâle, Stuttgart, Augsbourg, Nuremberg et Würzburg. Elle prit ensuite la route de la France. En décembre 1748, elle était à Reims, et fut reçue en janvier 1749 par le roi Louis XV à la Ménagerie royale de Versailles. À partir de février, elle passa cinq mois à Paris dans une baraque de la foire Saint-Germain, rue des Quatre-Vents où elle fut croquée par Oudry et servit de modèle au célèbre tableau grandeur nature conservé au Staatliches Museum de Schwerin.


Le succès fut prodigieux et confina au délire. On publia à son sujet des livres, des épigrammes, et même une cantatille. On lança la mode des perruques ou des parures « à la rhinocéros ». Clara fut examinée par Buffon, posa pour le peintre Jean-Baptiste Oudry - son Rhinocéros grandeur nature sera une des vedettes du Salon de 1750, et servira de modèle pour les gravures de l'Histoire Naturelle de Buffon. Elle fut certainement une source d’inspiration pour les marchands-merciers et les artisans. Fin 1749, Clara s'embarqua à Marseille et entreprit une tournée italienne. Puis, en passant par Vérone, Clara revint à Vienne, pour gagner Londres à la fin de l'année, où le roi et la famille royale vinrent l'admirer. On connaît moins en détail sa tournée dans les années 1752-1758. On signale son passage à Prague, en 1754 à Varsovie, Cracovie et de nouveau à Breslau, en 1755 à Copenhague. En 1758, elle retourna à Londres où elle mourut.


Trois interprétations de rhinocéros présents sur des pendules sont connues.


La première est directement issue de la gravure de Dürer où l’animal possède une seconde corne sur l’épaule, : c’est le cas de la pendule musicale vendue chez Sotheby’s à Londres, Treasures, le 3 juillet 2019, lot 16.

La seconde semble être une interprétation en bronze du modèle réalisé à l’origine en porcelaine par Kaendler pour la manufacture de Meissen (voir P. Pröschel et al., Vergoldete Bronzen, vol. II, p. 525, fig. 2) qui apparait aussi sur un portrait de la princesse de Parme peint par Laurent Pécheux en 1765 et conservé au palais Pitti à Florence.

Le troisième, au naturel assez réaliste, pourrait avoir été directement inspiré de Clara qui fut particulièrement « étudiée ». Il s’agit du modèle que nous présentons et dont Saint-Germain produisit plusieurs versions avec de légères variantes (indien ou angelot sur le haut) et différents horlogers, en pendule seule avec le rhinocéros fixé sur son socle, ou parfois reposant, en plus du socle, sur une imposante boîte richement décorée contenant un mécanisme musical.


Parmi les pendules musicales au rhinocéros signée ou attribuées au bronzier Jean-Joseph de Saint-Germain, il convient de citer :

-celle de l’ancienne collection Antenor Patiño, vente Ader Picard Tajan, palais Galliera, Paris, le 26 novembre 1975, lot 83 (signée, cadran signé Louis Montjoye, rhinocéros en bronze doré, base en bois de placage)

-celle conservée au musée du Louvre (inv. OA 10540 ; signée, mouvement de Viger, base en écaille brune)

-celle de l’ancienne collection Jaime-Ortiz Patiño, vente Sotheby’s, New York, le 20 mai 1992, lot 8 (attribuée, mouvement de Gudin, base en placage de corne teintée rouge)

-celle vendue chez Christie’s à Londres, le 6 juillet 2006, lot 151 (attribuée, mouvement de J-B. Dutertre, base en placage de corne teintée verte)

-celle de la vente Treasures, Sotheby’s, Londres, le 3 juillet 2019, lot 16 (attribuée, mouvement de Gudin, base en bois laqué imitant l’écaille brune).


Jean-Joseph de Saint-Germain (1719-1791) a conçu un grand nombre de pendules portées par différents animaux : éléphant, taureau, lion, sanglier et rhinocéros. Un prospectus commercial diffusé après son installation rue Saint-Nicolas permet d’avoir une idée de l’étendue de sa production et de son activité : « Saint-Germain, maître fondeur, ciseleur et modeleur fait et vend toutes sortes de boetes pour dorer en or moulu ou en couleur d’or, comme bronze, garnitures de commodes, bras de cheminée à plusieurs branches, grils, flambeaux, lustres, girandoles, boetes de pendules, cartels, de toutes espèces, boetes à carillon et à secondes, boetes elephantes, à lion, à taureau et autres, fait des modèles en cire, le tout à juste prix ».


Dans l’inventaire après-décès de sa première femme en 1747 sont déjà mentionnées « deux pendules au rhinocéros l’une pour modèle et l’autre finie prisées ensemble la somme de 140 l ». Les pendules aux rhinocéros ont eu les faveurs de la famille royale : l’une se retrouve chez la reine Marie-Antoinette aux Tuileries « pendule portée par un rhinocéros pose sur une terrasse doré en ormolu, l’animal noir de fumée portant sur son dos un tambour dans lequel est le mouvement à sonnerie du nom de J. B. Baillon » (E. Lery, « Les pendules de Marie-Antoinette », Revue de l’Histoire de Versailles et de Seine et Oise, 1931). Une autre « pendule à carillon représentant un rhinocéros portant la pendule et posé sur un coffre d’ébénisterie plaqué [en corne verte, barré] et garni de bronze doré d’or moulu » se trouvait au château de Saint-Cloud (AN, O/1/3371).


Pierre Ier Gille, dit Gille l’Ainé, fut reçu maître horloger en 1746. Sa signature apparaît sur le cadran, les mouvements d’horlogerie et musical de cette pendule. Il utilisa des caisses réalisées par les grands ébénistes et bronziers de son temps et travailla pour Auguste II de Saxe.