View full screen - View 1 of Lot 7. A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED, BRASS-INLAID AND BROWN TORTOISESHELL BOULLE MARQUETRY CONSOLE TABLE, LOUIS XIV, ATTRIBUTED TO ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE AND HIS WORKSHOP, CIRCA 1710-1720 | TABLE À SIX PIEDS EN MARQUETERIE D’ÉCAILLE BRUNE, LAITON GRAVÉS, PLACAGE D’ÉBÈNE ET BRONZE DORÉ D’ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, VERS 1710-1720, ATTRIBUÉE À ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE ET SON ATELIER.
7

A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED, BRASS-INLAID AND BROWN TORTOISESHELL BOULLE MARQUETRY CONSOLE TABLE, LOUIS XIV, ATTRIBUTED TO ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE AND HIS WORKSHOP, CIRCA 1710-1720 | TABLE À SIX PIEDS EN MARQUETERIE D’ÉCAILLE BRUNE, LAITON GRAVÉS, PLACAGE D’ÉBÈNE ET BRONZE DORÉ D’ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, VERS 1710-1720, ATTRIBUÉE À ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE ET SON ATELIER

Restricted Species

Estimate:

100,000

to
- 150,000 EUR

A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED, BRASS-INLAID AND BROWN TORTOISESHELL BOULLE MARQUETRY CONSOLE TABLE, LOUIS XIV, ATTRIBUTED TO ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE AND HIS WORKSHOP, CIRCA 1710-1720 | TABLE À SIX PIEDS EN MARQUETERIE D’ÉCAILLE BRUNE, LAITON GRAVÉS, PLACAGE D’ÉBÈNE ET BRONZE DORÉ D’ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, VERS 1710-1720, ATTRIBUÉE À ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE ET SON ATELIER

A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED, BRASS-INLAID AND BROWN TORTOISESHELL BOULLE MARQUETRY CONSOLE TABLE, LOUIS XIV, ATTRIBUTED TO ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE AND HIS WORKSHOP, CIRCA 1710-1720 | TABLE À SIX PIEDS EN MARQUETERIE D’ÉCAILLE BRUNE, LAITON GRAVÉS, PLACAGE D’ÉBÈNE ET BRONZE DORÉ D’ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, VERS 1710-1720, ATTRIBUÉE À ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE ET SON ATELIER

Estimate:

100,000

to
- 150,000 EUR

Lot sold:

237,500

EUR

A GILT-BRONZE MOUNTED, BRASS-INLAID AND BROWN TORTOISESHELL BOULLE MARQUETRY CONSOLE TABLE, LOUIS XIV, ATTRIBUTED TO ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE AND HIS WORKSHOP, CIRCA 1710-1720


of première and contre-partie marquetry, the top centred by a triumphal chariot drawn by oxen, supporting games of putti amongst scrolling foliage; the shaped frieze with central drawer with mask escutcheon and handle, on four cabriole legs headed by bearded masks, terminating in acanthus scrolled Régence sabots, with two straight tapered side supports headed by acanthus leaves, terminating in toupie feet; several bronzes marked with a crowned C; (the four scrolled acanthus Régence sabots); restoration to the stretcher


Haut. 78,5 cm, larg. 119 cm, prof. 48 cm ; height 31 in; width 47 in; depth 19 in


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

TABLE À SIX PIEDS EN MARQUETERIE D’ÉCAILLE BRUNE, LAITON GRAVÉS, PLACAGE D’ÉBÈNE ET BRONZE DORÉ D’ÉPOQUE LOUIS XIV, VERS 1710-1720, ATTRIBUÉE À ANDRÉ-CHARLES BOULLE ET SON ATELIER


la marqueterie en première partie et en contre-partie, le plateau centré d'un char triomphal tiré par des bœufs, supportant des jeux de putti, dans un entourage de rinceaux ; la ceinture ouvrant à un tiroir et reposant sur quatre pieds cambrés et deux pieds en gaine facetée ; nombreux bronzes poinçonnés au C couronné ; (les quatre sabots en enroulement d’acanthe d’époque Régence ; restauration à l'entretoise)

The overall condition is average and it needs to be considered as a all. The pierced entretoise has been restored in the past. The structure needs to be reinforced. The veneer of the console is made of various materials (ebony, brass, tortoiseshell) which have different properties and react differently through the time. As the support is quite dry it is lifting in places. There are no or minor elements of marquetry missing. A deep restoration needs to be undertaken both on the structure and marquetry.

The mounts have expected wear particularly to the flat surfaces such as frames. The estimate reflects the condition.

Nevertheless, great piece of furniture which needs a professional intervention to recover its previous brightness.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Please note that Sotheby's is not able to assist buyers with the shipment of any lots containing ivory and / or other restricted materials into the US. A buyer's inability to export or import these lots cannot justify a delay in payment or a sale's cancellation. | Veuillez noter que Sotheby's n'est pas en mesure d'assister les acheteurs avec le transport de lots contenant de l'ivoire et/ ou d'autres espèces protégées vers les Etats Unis. L'impossibilité par l'acheteur d'exporter ou d'importer ces lots ne justifie pas un retard de paiement ni l'annulation de la vente.

Collection of the Duchesse de Talleyrand, Palais Rose, Sotheby's Monaco, 14th June, 1982, Lot 492;

Collection of Barbara Piasecka Johnson, Sotheby's, New York, 21st May, 1992, Lot 101.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Collection de la duchesse de Talleyrand au Palais Rose, sa vente chez Sotheby's, Monaco, le 14 juin 1982, lot 492

Collection de Madame Barbara Piasecka Johnson, Sotheby's, New York, le 21 mai 1992, lot 101

Sotheby's à Monaco, 10 ans, 1975-1985, Paris, 1986

Alexandre Pradère, Les Ébènistes Français de Louis XIV à la Révolution, 1989, p.79, fig. 29 


Related Literature


R. H. Randall, "Template for Boulle Singerie" in Burlington Magazine, September 1969, pp. 549-553,

Sources & Techniques of Boulle Marquetry, exhibition catalogue at the Wallace Collection, London, 1996

P. Fuhring, "Designs for and after Boulle furniture" in Burlington Magazine, June 1992, pp. 350-362

P. Hugues, The Wallace Collection, Catalogue of Furniture, vol. II, London, 1996

J-N. Ronfort, André-Charles Boulle 1642-1732, un nouveau style pour l'Europe, exhibition catalogue, Francfort, 2009


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sotheby’s à Monaco, 10 ans, 1975-1985, Paris, 1986

Alexandre Pradère, Les Ébènistes Français de Louis XIV à la Révolution, 1989, p.79, fig. 29 


Références bibliographiques 


R. H. Randall, “Template for Boulle Singerie” in Burlington Magazine, septembre 1969, pp. 549-553,

Sources & Techniques of Boulle Marquetry, cat. expo. Wallace Collection, Londres, 1996

P. Fuhring, “Designs for and after Boulle furniture” in Burlington Magazine, juin 1992, pp. 350-362

P. Hugues, The Wallace Collection, Catalogue of Furniture, vol. II, Londres, 1996

J-N. Ronfort, André-Charles Boulle 1642-1732, un nouveau style pour l’Europe, cat. expo. Francfort, 2009

The description of this type of Boulle furniture at the beginning of the 18th century is somewhat imprecise. Whilst the term 'bureau' was sometimes used in documents at the time, André-Charles Boulle named this model a grande table. Some examples show a particularly neat inlay to the rear, which might suggest that these pieces were not necessarily intended to be placed against a wall. The tapered side leg was also used by André-Charles Boulle on his commodes en tambour with the various gilt-bronze ornaments present on many of the pieces made by the master. These tables were particularly appreciated by 18th century collectors like Gaignat and Randon de Boisset who had four, of which one is seen in a sketch of a view of his gallery, by Gabriel de Saint-Aubin. Other examples are mentioned in the sale catalogues of Julienne in 1767, Dubois in 1785 and Chevalier Lambert in 1787. The presence of the crowned C hallmarks on many of the gilt-bronze ornaments on our table indicates that it was sold between 1745 and 1749.


Origin of this model


This piece of furniture can be attributed with complete certainty to Boulle and his workshop, this on the basis of a drawing attributed to André-Charles Boulle entitled projet de table à trumeau, now at the Museum of Decorative Arts in Paris and which in turn was used as plate n° 5 in Mariette’s collection of engravings entitled Nouveaux dessins de meubles et ouvrages de bronze et de marqueterie inventés et gravés par André-Charles Boulle. According to J-R. Ronfort, the top is a collaboration between André-Charles Boulle and his son, Jean-Philippe Boulle. Two large engravings in black ink from a partly cut out and engraved metal plate and additions in red chalk, by the Boulle workshop for table tops, with dimensions identical to our piece, are in the collection of The Boston Museum of Fine Arts (inv. 1931.31.1243.1/2). One of these engravings closely corresponds to the drawing on our table top, entitled a "Chariot of Triumph" or Char à Bœufs, with singerie and putto on a swing borne by oxen. Before being adapted by Boulle father and son, this image draws its origin, notably in the transcription of the two harnessed oxen supporting the chariot, from the work of the Dutch engraver Cornelius Bos (1506 – 1564).)


These engravings represent parodies of country games by monkeys. The other Boulle workshop drawing in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts depicts "The Bird Cage". The processions are surrounded on each side by a composition of scrolls and intertwined arabesques typical of Boulle’s work, with the theme similar to the fashionable antics intended to make fun of the society of men at the end of the 17th century and during the 18th century. Lusingh Scheurleer made the connection between the decorative composition of these tops and the table delivered for the Menagerie at Versailles in 1701, where Louis XIV wanted a new decorative repertoire to amuse his granddaughter, the Duchess of Burgundy. Boulle had a table delivered with a decorated top for the Menagerie « dans le milieu d’un amour sur une escarlopette balancée par deux amours et un berger jouant de la musette, le reste remplis de figures et animaux grotesques et ornemens ». (trans. in the midst of love, on a swing, supported by two lovers and a shepherd playing music, the rest filled with grotesque figures and animals and ornaments).


Versions of the two Boston Museum engravings can be seen on several tables in either première, or contre-partie, or indeed with both, of which the following pairs can be cited:


-Wallace Collection, two tables : 160 (F424) with a Char à Bœufs Boulle marquetry top and 161 (F425) with La Cage aux Oiseaux.


-A pair presented for sale, Christie’s London, July 9, 2015, lot 130, both with a Char à Bœuf Boulle marquetry top, (the chariot travelling towards the right).


- A pair, the earlier Akkram Ojjeh Collection, Christie’s Monaco sale, December 11, 1999, lot 45, both tops depicting a bird cage.


-A pair kept at Grimsthorpe Castle, England, both tops with bird cage.


-A pair kept at Weimar Castle (inv. 33/64 a and b), one with a Char à Bœuf top and the other with a bird cage (see JN. Ronfort, op. Cit. N°11a and b, pp. 216-219).


Other individual tables are listed, such as one kept at the Bayerische Nationalmuseum in Munich, originally from the George Byng Collection (then sold from the Riahi Collection, Christie’s New York, November 2, 2000, lot 39) and another from the Raoul Ancel Collection, the two of which were later associated and presented together for sale at Sotheby’s London, July 5, 2006, lot 8.


Due to the evolution of taste and fashion by Boulle and his followers, inlcuding Etienne Doirate, the original model was adapted a few years later, between 1715-1725. This is evidenced by the table in the Bavarian National Collection, (see JN. Ronfort, op. cit. n°47, pp. 258-259), or that of the piece in the Léon Levy Collection, sold at Sotheby’s Paris, October 2, 2008, lot 6. Finally, another type of table with more sinuous form was developed between 1725-1730, announcing the general lines of the Louis XV style (see a piece in the Jones Collection at the Victoria & Albert Museum, inv. 1021-1882 and another in the Riahi Collection, sold by Christie’s New York, November 2, 2000, lot 32).


Hélie de Talleyrand-Périgord married Anna Gould in 1908, the latter who although divorced from Bonni de Castellane, nevertheless kept the fabulous collection he had accumulated at the Palais Rose. Violette de Talleyrand inherited this collection and when the Palais Rose was sold in 1962, part of the furniture was transferred to the Château du Marais, which she occupied after remarrying Gaston Palewski and from where the console was sold by Sotheby’s in Monaco in 1982.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------

La désignation de ce type de meuble au début du XVIIIème siècle est imprécise. André-Charles Boulle, lorsqu’il grave le modèle, le nomme Grande Table, tandis que le terme de bureau est parfois utilisé dans des documents de l’époque. Certains exemples présentent un décor marqueté particulièrement soigné sur la ceinture arrière, ce qui pourrait laisser penser qu’ils étaient destinés à être placés autrement qu’adossés à un mur. Le pied latéral fuselé a été utilisé par André-Charles Boulle sur les commodes en tambour arrondi par les deux bouts, et divers ornements en bronze doré se retrouvent sur de nombreuses pièces réalisées par le maître.


Ces tables furent particulièrement appréciées par les amateurs au XVIIIe siècle, comme Gaignat ; Randon de Boisset en possédait quatre que l’on distingue sur la vue de sa galerie esquissée par Gabriel de Saint-Aubin. Certaines sont mentionnées dans différents catalogues de vente, Julienne en 1767, Dubois en 1785 et Chevalier Lambert en 1787.


La présence sur notre table de poinçons au C couronné sur de nombreux ornements en bronze doré indique qu’elle fut commercialisée entre 1745 et 1749.


La genèse du modèle


Ce meuble peut être attribué en toute certitude à Boulle et à son atelier, sur la base d’un dessin attribué à André-Charles Boulle intitulé projet de table à trumeau, conservé au musée des Arts décoratifs à Paris, qui a lui-même servi de modèle à la planche n° 5 du recueil de gravures de Mariette intitulé Nouveaux deisseins de meubles et ouvrages de bronze et de marqueterie inventés et gravés par André-Charles Boulle.

Le plateau quant à lui serait, selon J-R. Ronfort, une collaboration entre Boulle père et son fils Jean-Philippe Boulle. Deux empreintes à l’encre et sanguine grandeur nature, très vraisemblablement réalisées sur des dessus de meuble (dimensions identiques à notre plateau) sont conservées au musée de Boston (inv. 1931.31.1243.1/2).


L’une correspond au dessin de notre plateau : il s’agit d’un char de Triomphe ou Char à Bœufs, qui, avant d’être adapté par Boulle père et fils, puise son origine dans l’œuvre du graveur hollandais Cornelius Bos (1506-1564), notamment dans la transcription des deux bœufs harnachés supportant le char. Les gravures représentent des parodies de jeux champêtres réalisés par des singes. L’autre dessin de Boston représente La Cage aux Oiseaux. Les processions sont entourées de chaque côté d’une composition de rinceaux et d’arabesques entremêlées typiques de l’œuvre de Boulle. Le thème s’apparente aux singeries destinées à tourner en dérision la société des hommes qui fut très en vogue à la fin du XVIIe et durant le XVIIIe siècle. Lusingh Scheurleer a fait le rapprochement entre la composition du décor de ces plateaux et la table livrée pour la Ménagerie à Versailles en 1701, où Louis XIV souhaitait un nouveau répertoire décoratif susceptible d’amuser sa petite-fille, la duchesse de Bourgogne. Boulle fit livrer pour la Ménagerie une table avec un plateau orné « dans le milieu d’un amour sur une escarpolette balancée par deux amours et un berger jouant de la musette, le reste remplis de figures et animaux grotesques et ornemens ».


Les deux relevés de Boston apparaissent sur plusieurs tables indistinctement en première ou contre-partie et parfois les deux mélangées, dont on peut citer les paires suivantes :


-Wallace Collection, deux tables : 160 (F424) avec un plateau Char à Bœufs, et 161 (F425) avec La Cage aux Oiseaux.


-Une paire présentée en vente, Christie’s Londres, le 9 juillet 2015, lot 130, toutes deux avec un plateau Char à Bœufs (se dirigeant vers la droite).


-Une paire, ancienne collection Akkram Ojjeh, vente Christie’s Monaco, 11 décembre 1999, lot 45, toutes deux avec un plateau Cage aux Oiseaux.


-Une paire conservée au château de Grimsthorpe, Angleterre, toutes deux avec un plateau Cage aux Oiseaux.


-Une paire conservée au château de Weimar (inv. 33/64 a et b), l’une avec un plateau Char à Bœufs l’autre avec un plateau Cage aux Oiseaux (voir J-N. Ronfort, op. cit. n°11 a et b, pp. 216-219).


D’autres tables orphelines sont répertoriées, comme celle conservée au Bayerische Nationalmuseum à Munich, celle de l’ancienne collection George Byng (puis collection Riahi, vente Christie’s New York, le 2 novembre 2000, lot 39) et celle de la collection Raoul Ancel qui, ultérieurement associée à une autre, fut présentée à la vente chez Sotheby’s à Londres, le 5 juillet 2006, lot 8.


Le modèle original fut adapté quelques années plus tard vers 1715-1725, à l’évolution des goûts et des styles par Boulle et ses suiveurs dont Etienne Doirat, comme en témoigne la table conservée dans les collections nationales bavaroises (voir J-N. Ronfort, op. cit. n° 47, pp. 258-259) ou celle de l’ancienne collection Léon Levy vendue chez Sotheby’s à Paris le 2 octobre 2008, lot 6. Enfin, une autre forme de table aux courbes plus sinueuses fut élaborée vers 1725-1730, annonçant les lignes générales du style Louis XV (voir celle de la collection Jones au Victoria & Albert Museum, inv. 1021-1882 et celle de l’ancienne collection Riahi vendue par Christie’s à New York le 2 novembre 2000, lot 32).


La duchesse de Talleyrand


Hélie de Talleyrand-Périgord épousa Anna Gould en 1908 ; celle-ci avait divorcé de Boni de Castellane quelques temps plus tôt mais avait conservé la fabuleuse collection qu’il avait accumulé au Palais Rose. Violette de Talleyrand hérita de ce patrimoine, et lors de la vente du Palais Rose en 1962, une partie du mobilier fut transférée au château du Marais qu’elle occupait après s’être remariée avec Gaston Palewski. La console s’y trouvait, avant d’être vendue par Sotheby’s à Monaco en 1982.