ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR
ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR
ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR
ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR
ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR
ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR
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Property Sold to Benefit the Acquisition Fund of the San Diego Museum of Art

ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR

Estimate: 10,000 - 15,000 USD

12

Property Sold to Benefit the Acquisition Fund of the San Diego Museum of Art

ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR

Estimate: 10,000 - 15,000 USD

Lot sold:112,500USD
(33 bids, reserve met)

Description

Property Sold to Benefit the Acquisition Fund of the San Diego Museum of Art

ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP

Venice 1518 - 1594

PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR


oil on canvas

canvas: 42½ by 37¼ in.; 108 by 94.6 cm.

framed: 57½ by 52 in.; 144.8 by 132.1 cm. 

Condition Report

This painting appears to be very fresh with nice retention of detail throughout, although there does appear to be some slight thinness in the thinly painted brown/grey background. The painting is under a very dirty yellow varnish. The quality and retention of detail in the face is very nice, with lively brushwork building up details in the hair, eyebrows, cheeks and even what appears to be a small lens or monocle at the left side of his head. The details of the sitter's garment is also nicely realized although the lead white used to outline some of the contours appears to have become more pronounced as some of the over glazes in these areas would appear to have become more transparent. There is scumbling in the upper right corner of the canvas that has become more visible, and this appears to be where the artist wiped off his loaded brush. Under UV it is difficult to read, however it appears that in the lower part of his face there has been a glaze applied. The face appears to be quite good, with a few small touches in the left temple, otherwise smaller touches here and there of little consequence. This painting is impressive and will improve with a clean.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

Provenance

Count Melzi d’Eril;

Marchese Zaccaria, Milan;

With Jacob M. Heimann, New York, by 1940;

Anne R. and Amy Putnam, San Diego;

By whom gifted to the Fine Arts Gallery, San Diego, 1950 (inv. no. 1950.113). 

Literature

Masterpieces of art, European paintings: from the New York World's Fair and the Golden Gate International Exposition

Masterpieces of Art From the European and American Collections, Detroit 1941, p. 16;

A. Millier, “San Diego Re-opens Fine Art Academy in Beautiful Balboa Park,” in Art Digest, vol. 22.7, 1 January 1948, p. 9;

J.D. Morse, Old Masters in America, New York 1955, p. 160;

The Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego Catalogue, San Diego 1960, p. 69;

B.B. Fredericksen, Census of Pre-Nineteenth Century Italian Paintings, Cambridge 1972, pp. 201, 520, 632 (as follower of Jacopo Tintoretto);

J. Marciari, Italian, Spanish, and French Paintings before 1850 in the San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego 2015, pp. 187-189, cat. no. 37, reproduced (dated circa 1577, as a late workshop follower of Tintoretto). 

Exhibited

New York, Corona Park, World's Fair, 1939-1940;

Toledo, Toledo Museum of Art, Four Centuries of Venetian Painting, 1940, no. 59 (as a portrait of Tommaso Rangone). 

Catalogue Note

By the early 1550s Tintoretto had refined his vocabulary as a portraitist and in 1551 he had replaced Titian as official portraitist to the Venetian Republic. His social connections, the quality of his work and above all his speed of execution secured him this position. Although the mounting pressures of commissions would inevitably diminish his own participation in many later works, Tintoretto's abilities as a portraitist were greatly admired by his contemporaries. Cristoforo Sorte, writing in his Ossservationi nella pittura in 1580, praised his 'perfettissimo giudicio nei ritratti' (most perfect judgement in portraits) and in his Trattato dell'arte della pittura of 1584 Gian Paolo Lomazzo refers to him as 'ritrattista d'eterna fama' (a portraitist of eternal fame).


In the present portrait, the expert and lively representation of sitter's face, with its beautifully molded contours and well-constructed features suggests it to be the work of Tintoretto himself. Like numerous portraits by the artist from this time period, the lower section was likely completed by an assistant in his studio.  


It has been suggested that this portrait is of the famous Venetian physician and arts patron Tommaso Rangone (1493-1577), whose bronze portrait prominently adorns the church of San Zulian, near the Piazza San Marco.

ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR
Property Sold to Benefit the Acquisition Fund of the San Diego Museum of Art
ATTRIBUTED TO JACOPO ROBUSTI, CALLED JACOPO TINTORETTO AND WORKSHOP | PORTRAIT OF A VENETIAN SENATOR
Lot Closed