View full screen - View 1 of Lot 57. HERMAN PIETERSZ. VERELST |  Still life of peaches, a fig, a watermelon, bunches of grapes and a rose arranged on and around a silver dish on a ledge.
57

HERMAN PIETERSZ. VERELST | Still life of peaches, a fig, a watermelon, bunches of grapes and a rose arranged on and around a silver dish on a ledge

VAT reduced rate

Estimate:

15,000

to
- 20,000 GBP

Property from a Swiss Private Collection

HERMAN PIETERSZ. VERELST | Still life of peaches, a fig, a watermelon, bunches of grapes and a rose arranged on and around a silver dish on a ledge

HERMAN PIETERSZ. VERELST | Still life of peaches, a fig, a watermelon, bunches of grapes and a rose arranged on and around a silver dish on a ledge

Estimate:

15,000

to
- 20,000 GBP

Lot sold:

62,500

GBP

Property from a Swiss Private Collection

HERMAN PIETERSZ. VERELST

The Hague(?) 1641/2 - 1702 London

STILL LIFE OF PEACHES, A FIG, A WATERMELON, BUNCHES OF GRAPES AND A ROSE ARRANGED ON AND AROUND A SILVER DISH ON A LEDGE


signed and dated lower right: H. Verelst. F. / 1687

oil on canvas

unframed: 75.5 x 90 cm.; 28¾ x 35½ in.

framed: 98 x 110 cm.; 38 5/8 x 43 3/8 in.


Please note, Condition 11 of the Conditions of Business for Buyers (Online Only) is not applicable to this lot.


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The old relining is stable and strong, although the canvas is not completely flat. The painted surface sits under a very thick and uneven layer of old discoloured varnish which ultra-violet light does not properly penetrate. There is evidence visible to the naked eye of much older retouching, and there have been attempts to clean the varnish in a few parts, with more recent retouching there apparent. This painting would benefit enormously from a careful cleaning, because the handling of the fruit and leaves is of a high order and appears to be generally well-preserve. Relining might also be advisable. Carved and giltwood frame is not original but is in good condition


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.  

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE INCLUDED IN THE CATALOGUE.


Anonymous sale, London, Christie's, 17 November 1950, lot 162, for 45 guineas to Nicholls.

A. van der Willigen and F.G. Meijer, A Dictionary of Dutch and Flemish Still-life painters working in oils 1525 - 1725, Leiden 2003, p. 204.

This is a very rare still-life by Herman Verelst, who was the son of the genre painter Pieter Verelst (1618-88) and elder brother of the well-known flower painter Simon Verelst (1644-1721). Together with his brother he joined the Painters' Guild in The Hague in 1663, and both shortly after settled in nearby Voorburg. While Simon left for England in 1668/9 to pursue a successful career as a still-life painter, Herman stayed in Holland before travelling to Italy in 1680 and then to Vienna. In 1683 he fled Vienna at the approach of the Turkish armies and taking his family, rejoined his brother in London. Here, like his brother, he worked as a still-life painter, and seems to have enjoyed steady patronage as a portraitist. Their close relationship is witnessed by a near identical version of this composition painted by Simon and today in a private collection, which suggests both were painted in London.1 Although fruit still lifes such as this are now extremely rare in Herman's œuvre, as Meijer notes, old records of his work in this vein refer mainly to fruit pieces, sometimes specifically mentioning silver objects such as the dish found in the present canvas. Herman died in London in 1702 and his posthumous sale was held on the 31 December of that year.2 


1 Information kindly provided by Dr. Fred G. Meijer.

2 E.K. Waterhouse, The Dictionary of 16th and 17th century British Painters, Woodbridge 1988, p. 283.