View full screen - View 1 of Lot 149. GOLD AND HARDSTONE INTAGLIO BRACELET, CIRCA 1860.
149

GOLD AND HARDSTONE INTAGLIO BRACELET, CIRCA 1860

VAT applies to hammer price and buyer's premium

Estimate:

15,000

to
- 25,000 CHF

GOLD AND HARDSTONE INTAGLIO BRACELET, CIRCA 1860

GOLD AND HARDSTONE INTAGLIO BRACELET, CIRCA 1860

Estimate:

15,000

to
- 25,000 CHF

Lot sold:

18,750

CHF

GOLD AND HARDSTONE INTAGLIO BRACELET, CIRCA 1860


Set with oval chalcedony intaglios carved with themes and motifs of Classical scenes and mythological subjects, length approximately 190mm.


Archaeological discoveries during the 19th century at sites such as Pompeii and Herculaneum inspired imitations of gold ornaments from antiquity. The Roman jewelers Castellani sought to achieve the techniques of gold granulation and metalwork developed by the ancient Etruscans. The Castellani shop in Rome became the destination for Grand Tourists seeking mementos of the past. Giacinto Melillo (1845-1915) joined Alessandro Castellani at his workshop in Naples as a teenager with his apprenticeship only partially completed. By 1870 he was managing the workshop on his own and continued to make jewels in the ”Archaeological style” similar to those in lot 149, often using ancient hardstone intaglios. He was awarded the Grand Prix and Legion d’Honneur at the Paris Exhibition in 1900. For an informative discussion see “Giacinto Melillo, A Pupil of the Castellani” by Geoffrey Munn, The Connoisseur, Sept. 20, 1977, pages 20-22.


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Gems with few to some scratches, nicks and abrasions, very few hairlines. Clasps secure, one with safety catch to the side. Signs of normal wear to the metal, scratches consistent with use. Some signs of tarnish to the reverse consistent with age. In good condition. Gross weight approximately 40 grams.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Please note that colour, clarity and weight of gemstones are statements of opinion only and not statements of fact by Sotheby's. We do not guarantee, and are not responsible for any certificate from a gemological laboratory that may accompany the property. We do not guarantee that watches are in working order. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue, in particular to the Notice regarding the treatment and condition of gemstones.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Archaeological discoveries during the 19th century at sites such as Pompeii and Herculaneum inspired imitations of gold ornaments from antiquity. Lot 149 is comparable in style to the Roman jeweller Castellani’s technique. He sought to achieve the techniques of gold granulation and metalwork developed by the ancient Etruscans. The Castellani shop in Rome became the destination for Grand Tourists seeking mementos of the past. Giacinto Melillo (1845-1915) joined Alessandro Castellani at his workshop in Naples as a teenager with his apprenticeship only partially completed. By 1870 he was managing the workshop on his own and continued to make jewels in the ”Archaeological style” similar to those in lot 149, often using ancient hardstone intaglios. He was awarded the Grand Prix and Legion d’Honneur at the Paris Exhibition in 1900. For an informative discussion see “Giacinto Melillo, A Pupil of the Castellani” by Geoffrey Munn, The Connoisseur, Sept. 20, 1977, pages 20-22.