View full screen - View 1 of Lot 152. AN AUSTRIAN PARCEL-GILT SILVER MARRIAGE BELT, MAKER'S MARK MS, VIENNA, LATE 16TH - EARLY 17TH CENTURY.
152

AN AUSTRIAN PARCEL-GILT SILVER MARRIAGE BELT, MAKER'S MARK MS, VIENNA, LATE 16TH - EARLY 17TH CENTURY

Estimate:

3,000

to
- 5,000 USD

Property of a New York Private Collector

AN AUSTRIAN PARCEL-GILT SILVER MARRIAGE BELT, MAKER'S MARK MS, VIENNA, LATE 16TH - EARLY 17TH CENTURY

AN AUSTRIAN PARCEL-GILT SILVER MARRIAGE BELT, MAKER'S MARK MS, VIENNA, LATE 16TH - EARLY 17TH CENTURY

Estimate:

3,000

to
- 5,000 USD

Lot sold:

2,520

USD

Property of a New York Private Collector

AN AUSTRIAN PARCEL-GILT SILVER MARRIAGE BELT, MAKER'S MARK MS, VIENNA, LATE 16TH - EARLY 17TH CENTURY


the interlocking clasp with applied flowers on cast panels, which repeat throughout the belt linked by double chains, in two parts connected by a half ring in center, with a velvet-covered stand

maker’s mark M.S. possibly for Marx Solmon or Michel Stanglo, with city and control mark to back of clasp

length 40 1/8 in.

101.9 cm

Small losses to applied decoration on panels, otherwise good condition.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

This belt is similar to a German "Sivlonot" belt at the Israel Museum in Tel Aviv, described as possibly 16th century, accession number B71.0227 101/022 (https://www.imj.org.il/en/collections/358446)


Sivlonot were a German Jewish tradition dating from the 16th century, when silver or gold chains were sent as a gift by the bridegroom to his future bride. They were worn under the bridal canopy and throughout the following week, then often brought out again for holidays and ceremonial occasions.