VERY RARE PILGRIM CENTURY TURNED AND JOINED MAPLE, OAK AND PINE CRADLE, SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS OR RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1685
VERY RARE PILGRIM CENTURY TURNED AND JOINED MAPLE, OAK AND PINE CRADLE, SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS OR RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1685
VERY RARE PILGRIM CENTURY TURNED AND JOINED MAPLE, OAK AND PINE CRADLE, SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS OR RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1685
VERY RARE PILGRIM CENTURY TURNED AND JOINED MAPLE, OAK AND PINE CRADLE, SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS OR RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1685
1605

Property from the Collection of The Rhode Island School Of Design

VERY RARE PILGRIM CENTURY TURNED AND JOINED MAPLE, OAK AND PINE CRADLE, SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS OR RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1685

Estimate: 15,000 - 25,000 USD

Property from the Collection of The Rhode Island School Of Design

VERY RARE PILGRIM CENTURY TURNED AND JOINED MAPLE, OAK AND PINE CRADLE, SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS OR RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1685

Estimate: 15,000 - 25,000 USD

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Lot Details

Description

VERY RARE PILGRIM CENTURY TURNED AND JOINED MAPLE, OAK AND PINE CRADLE, SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS OR RHODE ISLAND, CIRCA 1685


appears to retain remnants of its original red wash paint, lacking a turned spindle and roof boards, rockers are 18th century replacements.

Height 32 in. by Width 26 in. by Length 35 in.

Condition Report

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Cataloguing

Provenance

Discovered in Abington, Massachusetts;

Brooks Reed Gallery, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts;

Eliza Greene Metcalf Radeke (1854-1931), Providence, Rhode Island.

Literature

Wallace Nutting, Furniture of the Pilgrim Century, 1620-1720, (Framingham, MA: Old American Company, 1924), p. 425, no. 605;

Brooks Reed Galleries advertisement, The Antiquarian, 5:2 (September 1925), p. 18;

Wallace Nutting, Furniture Treasury, (New York: Macmillan, 1928), no. 1567;

Russell Hawes Kettell, The Pine Furniture of Early New England, (Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Doran & company, Inc., 1929), no. 217;

Miriam A. Banks, "Art in Primitive Americana: The Radeke Collection," The Fine Arts, vol 18, January 1932, pp. 27-9, 56;

Elizabeth T. Casey, "Early American Cradles," Bulletin of the Rhode Island School of Design, vol. 20, January 1932, pp. 5-8;

Christopher P. Monkhouse and Thomas S. Michie, American Furniture in Pendleton House, (Providence: Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, 1986), pp. 214-5, no. 159.

Catalogue Note

Joined American cradles are one of the rarest seventeenth century furniture forms. Crafted for affluent children, few were likely ever made and approximately only thirteen survive today.1 Most examples are simpler in construction and are comprised of four turned posts and four paneled sides. Only three examples survive with multiple turnings in the hood and along the side and foot rails. The foot post finial turnings relate directly to a cradle that once belonged to a Nathan Cushing, Providence, Rhode Island (RIF4016) and is illustrated in Wallace Nutting, Furniture Treasury, (New York: Macmillan, 1928), no. 1571. One of the floor boards of the cradle has crease molding profile, very similar to that of the Cushing cradle, and the hood’s spindle turnings relate to the spindles found in several seventeenth century spindle-back armchairs associated to Rhode Island (see Patricia E. Kane et al., Art and Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650–1830, (New Haven, CT: Yale University Art Gallery, 2016), 143–144, no. 4). Although previously attributed to a southeastern Massachusetts origin, these associations suggest that this cradle may have been made in Rhode Island. For additional information on American cradles and their history and use, see R. Ruthie Dibble, “The Hands that Rocked the Cradle: Interpretations in the Life of an Object,” American Furniture 2012, ed. Luke Beckerdite, (Milwaukee, WI: Chipstone Foundation, 2012), pp. 1-23.


1 The list of known joined seventeenth century cradles consist of: the Cushman family cradle from Plymouth, Massachusetts at the Wadsworth Atheneum (Robert Blair St. George, The Wrought Covenant, (Brockton Art Center-Fuller Memorial, 1979), p. 52, no. 53); the Thacher family cradle from Yarmouth, Massachusetts at Historic New England (Nancy Carlisle, Cherished Possessions, (Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, 2003), p. 90-1, no. 24); the Hinkley family cradle from Barnstable, Massachusetts (Brian Cullity, A Cubberd, Four Joyne Stools & Other Smalle Thinges, (Heritage Plantation of Sandwich, 1994), p 136-7, no. 144); the Noyes family cradle from Duxbury, Massachusetts in the Pilgrim Society (Robert Blair St. George, The Wrought Covenant, (Brockton Art Center-Fuller Memorial, 1979), p. 46, no. 39); a cradle from Windsor, Connecticut at the Wadsworth Atheneum (Wallace Nutting, Furniture of the Pilgrim Century, (Old American Company 1924), p. 435, no. 614); the Pynchon family cradle from Springfield, Massachusetts at the Ramapogue Historical Society (The Great River, entry by Philip Zea, edited by Gerald W.R. Ward & William N. Hosley, Jr., (Wadsworth Atheneum, 1985), pp. 195-6, no. 74); the Barker-Plant family cradle from the Springfield, Massachusetts area (Wallace Nutting, Furniture of the Pilgrim Century, (Old American Company 1924), p. 435, no. 615); a cradle from Suffolk County, Massachusetts (Frances Gruber Safford, American Furniture in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2007), pp. 117-9, no. 45); another unpublished Suffolk County cradle at the Boston Society (acc. no. 1979.0006); and lastly two cradles from the Newbury, Massachusetts area (Peter Benes, Old-Town and the Waterside, (Historical Society of Old Newbury, 1986), p. 42-3, nos. 14, 15).

Important Americana
Live Auction Begins:26 Jan 2020 | 03:00 PM GMT