View full screen - View 1 of Lot 1022. RAMMELLZEE | DEATH NOTE: INTRUDE THE PRELUDE - PAINT A TIME THAT CLOCKS OUT.
1022

RAMMELLZEE | DEATH NOTE: INTRUDE THE PRELUDE - PAINT A TIME THAT CLOCKS OUT

Dear Keith: Works from the Personal Collection of Keith Haring

RAMMELLZEE | DEATH NOTE: INTRUDE THE PRELUDE - PAINT A TIME THAT CLOCKS OUT

RAMMELLZEE | DEATH NOTE: INTRUDE THE PRELUDE - PAINT A TIME THAT CLOCKS OUT

Dear Keith: Works from the Personal Collection of Keith Haring

RAMMELLZEE

1960 - 2010

DEATH NOTE: INTRUDE THE PRELUDE - PAINT A TIME THAT CLOCKS OUT


acrylic, epoxy resin, paper collage, cardboard, clock and paintbrush on wood, in artist’s frame

48¾ by 67½ by 3 in. (123.8 by 171.5 by 7.6 cm.)

Executed in 1988.

This work is in very good and sound condition overall. All elements are present and stable. There is a surface layer of dust throughout. There is pigment separtion to the white spraypaint passages throughout the piece, visible upon close inspection. There are a few scattered tears to the paper elements which are stable. There is minor wear, pinpoint pigment loss and soft creasing to some of the large paper elements extending beyond the resin surface, visible upon close inspection. There is some minor wear to the artist’s frame, visible upon close inspection. 


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

Barbara Braathen Gallery, New York

Estate of Keith Haring, New York (acquired from the above in 1988)

The Keith Haring Foundation, New Jersey (by bequest from the above in 1990)

New York, Barbara Braathen Gallery, Rammellzee: Love Letters and Death Notes, 1988

Rammellzee was a prominent figure in the New York Street Art scene in the 1980s alongside Basquiat and Keith Haring. The American artist is known for his graffiti and mixed-media sculptures, as well as a pioneer of early Hip Hop, recording Beat Bop with K-Rob in 1983. Rammellzee is known for his theory of Gothic Futurism, which contends that when liberated from linguistic structures, individual letters can be potent self-signifying enigmas. With spiky lettering, he describes a battle between letters and the standardization imposed by the rules of the alphabet. “The idea is to read this stuff, for humans to have something to read, not just blow them away”. Haring shared Rammellzee’s fascination of semiotics, the culturally constructed meaning of words and symbols. Haring purchased this work from Rammellzee’s one-man show at Barbara Braathen Gallery in 1988. As Braathen recounts:


“In 1988, Keith came to the opening of Rammellzee’s one-person exhibition at my gallery at 33 Bleecker Street.The show was of a series called Love Letters and Death Notes; there were fourteen works. It was a very crowded opening, but Keith carefully viewed all of the pieces, and decided to buy this one, informing me right then. I invoiced him, he paid for it, and at the end of the exhibition, it was delivered to his place (which was basically around the corner, on Broadway).


Although I will speculate here, I believe that Keith knew Rammellzee from the early 1980s, through the downtown nightclub scene, as well as the all-borough NYC graffiti scene. Rammellzee’s very important rap performance for Charlie Ahearn’s 1983 film Wild Style put him on the map of artistic influencers. Keith was completely woven into this culture, and would have been aware of and familiar with Rammellzee at least since then, if not before. 


Keith recognized that Rammellzee was an important talent, and wanted to own a piece. Jean-Michel Basquiat also recognized him, producing the record “Beat Bop” with Rammellzee. Also note that Clemente did Rammellzee’s portrait which is in his large Guggenheim catalog of 2000.


At that time in the art scene of NYC, ‘everybody knew everybody,’ as they say!”