View full screen - View 1 of Lot 103. TWO MINIATURE MAMLUK SILVER AND GOLD-INLAID BRASS CANDLESTICKS, EGYPT OR SYRIA, EARLY 15TH CENTURY.
103

TWO MINIATURE MAMLUK SILVER AND GOLD-INLAID BRASS CANDLESTICKS, EGYPT OR SYRIA, EARLY 15TH CENTURY

Estimate:

18,000

to
- 25,000 GBP

TWO MINIATURE MAMLUK SILVER AND GOLD-INLAID BRASS CANDLESTICKS, EGYPT OR SYRIA, EARLY 15TH CENTURY

TWO MINIATURE MAMLUK SILVER AND GOLD-INLAID BRASS CANDLESTICKS, EGYPT OR SYRIA, EARLY 15TH CENTURY

Estimate:

18,000

to
- 25,000 GBP

TWO MINIATURE MAMLUK SILVER AND GOLD-INLAID BRASS CANDLESTICKS, EGYPT OR SYRIA, EARLY 15TH CENTURY


each with splayed body with straight drip-pan and straight cylindrical neck, engraved and inlaid in silver and gold with quadrupeds and birds between trees, stylised foliage on drip tray, knotted design on necks, each with old collector's number '11556' to interior

(2)

12.7 and 12.5cm. height

Both with most of silver inlay remaining although mainly rubbed on on drip-pan as consistent with use, some remnants of gold also on the decoration, one with a crack line near base, some minor nicks and abrasion to extremities, as viewed.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

This near pair of delicately decorated miniature candlesticks were very fashionable with the fifteenth century Venetian elite as attested by models found with local coats of arms (see two in the Museo Correr's collection, published in Carboni 2007, p.65, cat. nos.95-96). It is now accepted amongst scholars that these were made in the Islamic world and exported.