A RARE AND IMPORTANT KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED POTTERY PITCHER, PERSIA, CIRCA 1200-20 AD
A RARE AND IMPORTANT KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED POTTERY PITCHER, PERSIA, CIRCA 1200-20 AD
A RARE AND IMPORTANT KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED POTTERY PITCHER, PERSIA, CIRCA 1200-20 AD
A RARE AND IMPORTANT KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED POTTERY PITCHER, PERSIA, CIRCA 1200-20 AD
A RARE AND IMPORTANT KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED POTTERY PITCHER, PERSIA, CIRCA 1200-20 AD
A RARE AND IMPORTANT KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED POTTERY PITCHER, PERSIA, CIRCA 1200-20 AD
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A RARE AND IMPORTANT KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED POTTERY PITCHER, PERSIA, CIRCA 1200-20 AD

Estimate: 120,000 - 160,000 GBP

A RARE AND IMPORTANT KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED POTTERY PITCHER, PERSIA, CIRCA 1200-20 AD

Estimate: 120,000 - 160,000 GBP

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Bid:85,000GBP

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Lot Details

Description

A RARE AND IMPORTANT KASHAN TURQUOISE GLAZED POTTERY PITCHER, PERSIA, CIRCA 1200-20 AD


the fritware body painted in black under a turquoise glaze, with three calligraphic rows, the neck with vegetal bands, a row of stylised birds to shoulder, body with palmettes surrounded by multiple outlines, foliate motifs near base, linear handle

31.5cm. height

Condition Report

Intact, the handle broken and restored with associated restoration at top and base where break happened, with associated repair, a break also near the rim with associated restoration and some overpainting, a minor break to shoulder, craquelure to glaze and iridescence throughout, as viewed.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Provenance

Sotheby’s London, 12 October 1982, lot 25.

Ex-collection Jacques O. Matossian (1894-1963).

Ex-collection Edwin Binney III (1925-1986).

Exhibited

Islamic Art from the collection of Edwin Binney 3rd, Travelling Exhibition, Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C., 1966-68.

The Unity of Islamic Art, Islamic Art Gallery: King Faisal Center for Research and Islamic Studies, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 1985.

Literature

E. Atil and O. Hoare (eds.), The Unity of Islamic Art, Islamic Art Gallery: King Faisal Center for Research and Islamic Studies, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 1985, pp.156-7, no.121.

M. Bahrami, Gurgan Faiences, Cairo, 1949, pl.XVIII.

Catalogue Note

inscriptions


Undeciphered.


The present pitcher evidences the dramatic innovations in ceramic decoration which were firmly established in Persia by the end of the twelfth century (Watson 2004). These new techniques emerged as ceramics began being made with white frit mass rather than red clay. This gave potters a white ground to paint directly with black slip before coating with a variety of coloured glazes such as the present turquoise. 


This pitcher’s complex design illustrates the decorative freedom of the technique. The black slip used to produce such patterns was not prone to running during the firing process and thus potters of the period increasingly employed distinguished lines and motifs. The layered design wraps lengthways around the pitcher and integrates intricate palmette medallions with cursive inscriptions. 


In the early 1940s the discovery of many similar vessels that had been buried in large pottery oil-jars in Gurgan, pointedly advanced the understanding of ceramics from this period. "Found stockpiled in large storage jars, these vessels consisted of monochrome, unglazed and luster-painted ceramics datable, stylistically and by inscribed dates, to the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries. ...It has since been proposed that the vessels contained in the jars could have been the supply of a merchant who had imported them presumably from Kashan and had hidden them for safekeeping on the eve of the Mongol invasions...(Pancaroglu 2007, p.124)".


The provenance of the present work further heightens its importance: Jacques Matossian was a collector living in Alexandria in the early twentieth century known for his extensive collection of Coptic textiles and Islamic art, much of which is now housed in museums worldwide from bequests made between 1949-59. Edwin Binney III, who was heir to the Crayola fortune, is best known for his extensive collection of miniature paintings, now in the San Diego Museum of Art. 



Arts of the Islamic World & India including Fine Rugs & Carpets
Advance bidding opens:11 May 2020 | 08:00 AM GMT