View full screen - View 1 of Lot 37. SIR EDWARD COLEY BURNE-JONES, BT., A.R.A., R.W.S. AND STUDIO | FOUR CARTOONS FOR WINDOWS.
37

SIR EDWARD COLEY BURNE-JONES, BT., A.R.A., R.W.S. AND STUDIO | FOUR CARTOONS FOR WINDOWS

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 60,000 USD

John Richardson: A Scholar Collects

SIR EDWARD COLEY BURNE-JONES, BT., A.R.A., R.W.S. AND STUDIO | FOUR CARTOONS FOR WINDOWS

SIR EDWARD COLEY BURNE-JONES, BT., A.R.A., R.W.S. AND STUDIO | FOUR CARTOONS FOR WINDOWS

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 60,000 USD

John Richardson: A Scholar Collects

SIR EDWARD COLEY BURNE-JONES, BT., A.R.A., R.W.S. AND STUDIO

FOUR CARTOONS FOR WINDOWS


the first:

Window design for St Saviour's, Leeds

signed with initials E.B.J- (lower left), inscribed St Saviour’s Leed’s and F.P 358 (upper left) and extensively inscribed at upper corners

black chalk and wash over pencil on paper laid down on linen wrapped board

sheet: 64⅞ by 19½ in.; 164.5 by 49.5 cm

framed: 70½ by 25¾ in.; 179 by 65.5 cm


the second:

Moses

signed with initials E.B.J- (lower left) and inscribed Anticolenso (on the tablet)

black chalk on paper

sheet: 51⅛ by 20½ in.; 130 by 52.5 cm

framed: 55½ by 24 in.; 141 by 61 cm


the third:

St Peter

signed with initials E.B.J- (lower left) and inscribed F.P. 349 New Ferry Chh and indistinctly (upper left and right)

black chalk on paper laid down on paperboard

sheet: 53⅝ by 15⅜ in.; 136.2 by 39 cm

framed: 58¼ by 19½ in.; 148 by 49.5 cm


the fourth:

St Jude

signed with initials E.B.J- (lower right) and inscribed F.P. 351 New Ferry Chh and indistinctly (upper left and right) black chalk on paper

sheet: 53⅞ by 15⅜ in.; 136.8 by 39 cm

framed: 58¼ by 19½ in.; 148 by 49.5 cm

Each sheet is in fair condition with surface dirt, time darkening, hard and soft creases, likely related to laying the sheets down, and accretions, and scattered spots of foxing and discolorations to the sheets are visible. Each sheet has nicks and abrasions at the edges and minor scattered repaired. Most of the cartoons are made of sheets of paper pieced together, especially at the upper corners.


Additionally, Saint Saviour's Leeds has previous repaired tears and hard creases, especially at the edge at left and through the center of the work.


Additionally, Moses is squared for transfer in pencil. Potential water damage along lower edge. Scattered repaired tears, including two along the lower edge and one along the center left edge, and minor scratches.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colors and shades which are different to the lot's actual color and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation. The condition report is a statement of opinion only. For that reason, the condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot. NOTWITHSTANDING THIS ONLINE CONDITION REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE/BUSINESS APPLICABLE TO THE RESPECTIVE SALE.

In 1861, William Morris created Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. —known as Morris & Co. after 1875 —as a single source from which fashionable families could purchase the furnishings needed for their new Arts and Crafts style homes. While the textiles and wall coverings that Morris & Co. created remain popular today, one of their greatest successes was in stained glass, created for private commissions and church windows throughout England.


Morris employed leading artists of the day (in many cases friends) such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Ford Madox Brown and Philip Webb (the architect who designed Morris’ Red House), to design the company’s windows. Individual designs were often worked on by several different hands, but from the 1870s onward, Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones was the leading designer of windows for Morris & Co. His prolific cartoons are filled with color notes and hastily sketched directions meant for the skilled craftsmen and glass painters who created the windows to the artist’s specifications. These cartoons were added to Morris & Co.’s catalogue of designs, used throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as a source book, allowing clients to adapt previously created cartoons to fit their needs or create new windows based on multiple designs.