View full screen - View 1 of Lot 720. Jan Frans van Dael | A STILL LIFE OF ROSES, PEONIES, AND OTHER FLOWERS ON A LEDGE.
720

Jan Frans van Dael | A STILL LIFE OF ROSES, PEONIES, AND OTHER FLOWERS ON A LEDGE

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 60,000 USD

Jan Frans van Dael | A STILL LIFE OF ROSES, PEONIES, AND OTHER FLOWERS ON A LEDGE

Jan Frans van Dael | A STILL LIFE OF ROSES, PEONIES, AND OTHER FLOWERS ON A LEDGE

Estimate:

40,000

to
- 60,000 USD

Jan Frans van Dael

1764 - 1840

BELGIAN

A STILL LIFE OF ROSES, PEONIES, AND OTHER FLOWERS ON A LEDGE


signed Vandael (lower left)

oil on panel

26 7/8 by 21 7/8 in.

68.3 by 55.6 cm


We are grateful to Fred G. Meijer for confirming the attribution of the present lot after first hand inspection.

The panel is laid down on a modern cradled panel and has three vertical lines at center that run from top to bottom, each about 4 in. apart. The details on this image read well, especially on the flowers and leaves. The center of the flowers, such as the red ones at bottom left, as well as the yellow ones at center, keep some of its impasto, meanwhile the veins on the leaves can be fully appreciated. The landscape on the background also presents well, though some minor details on the shadows have sunken. Some frame abrasions are barely visible along the top edge, meanwhile a few spots of abrasions are visible only when unframed along the bottom edge. Inspection under UV reveals an uneven varnish. There appears to be barely any retouching to the flora on the basket, while a few spots are scattered on the foreground and background. Retouchings also fluoresce along the aforementioned lines. Offered in a giltwood frame.


This condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. It is not a full description of condition. Images of the lot provided may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the images may represent colors and shades which are different than the lot’s actual color and shades. This condition report may not make reference to all imperfections, restorations, or alterations. Sotheby’s is not a professional conservator or restorer, and we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Jan Frans van Dael, a Flemish artist, was one of the most highly regarded still life painters of flowers and fruits in Paris during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The artist studied architecture at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp before moving to Paris in 1786. By 1793 Van Dael was appointed the official painter to the Court and was granted residence in the Louvre. Louis XVIII (1755-1824), Empress Joséphine de Beauharnais (1763-1814), and Marie Louise, Duchess of Parma (1791-1847) were among his greatest patrons and each owned several of his canvases. The extent of his popularity was such that in 1825 Charles X (1757-1836) bestowed on Van Dael the medal of the National Order of the Legion of Honour.


While residing in the Louvre, Van Dael was under the guidance of his fellow countryman, Gerard van Spaendonck (1746–1822), who influenced Van Dael's still lifes for the rest of his career. Although Van Dael must have carefully studied flowers to depict them with such accuracy, the large scale of his panel and the jewel-like colors he used indicate a movement away from the scientific, and even moralizing concerns of earlier generations. In this work it is easy to see how Van Dael established himself as a leading still life painter with his elegant and sumptuous depiction of flowers. The inclusion of a landscape in the background adds a convincing impression of depth and substance to his luxurious motifs.