A VICTORIAN ASHFORD MARBLE MODEL OF CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE, LATE 19TH CENTURY
A VICTORIAN ASHFORD MARBLE MODEL OF CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE, LATE 19TH CENTURY
A VICTORIAN ASHFORD MARBLE MODEL OF CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE, LATE 19TH CENTURY
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PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF LADY ELIZABETH CAVENDISH CVO

A VICTORIAN ASHFORD MARBLE MODEL OF CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE, LATE 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 100 - 150 GBP

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF LADY ELIZABETH CAVENDISH CVO

A VICTORIAN ASHFORD MARBLE MODEL OF CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE, LATE 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 100 - 150 GBP

Lot Sold:625GBP

Lot Details

Description

Property from the Estate of Lady Elizabeth Cavendish CVO

A VICTORIAN ASHFORD MARBLE MODEL OF CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE, LATE 19TH CENTURY


inscribed with hieroglyphics and 'OBELISK / CALLED / CLEOPATRA'S / NEEDLE / AT / ALEXANDRA' to the stepped plinth

36cm high; 1ft.2⅛in.

Condition Report

In overall good condition.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

The misnomer 'Ashford Marble' in fact refers to the hard limestone quarried in two quarries near Ashford-in-the-Water, Derbyshire, which is polished to jet black lustre in the eponymous workshops. It proved popular as a building material and as early as 1580 - Bess of Hardwick commissioned a chimneypiece for Chatsworth - but it was not until the 19th century that it really became fashionable as a material for both ornaments and furniture. It was promoted by William Spencer Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire who encouraged this new development after admiring Florentine work in Italy.

STYLE: Private Collections
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