A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SIDE TABLE, CIRCA 1760
A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SIDE TABLE, CIRCA 1760
A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SIDE TABLE, CIRCA 1760
A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SIDE TABLE, CIRCA 1760
A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SIDE TABLE, CIRCA 1760
A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SIDE TABLE, CIRCA 1760
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Property from an Important Private Collection

A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SIDE TABLE, CIRCA 1760

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 GBP

Property from an Important Private Collection

A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SIDE TABLE, CIRCA 1760

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 GBP

Lot Sold:37,500GBP

Lot Details

Description

Property from an Important Private Collection

A GEORGE III CARVED GILTWOOD SIDE TABLE, CIRCA 1760


the later rosso levanto marble top with a sienna marble border, reduced in size

83cm. high, 194cm. wide; 2ft. 8¾in., 6ft. 4¼in.

Condition Report

A grand table in overall good restored condition. Small chip to Siena banding of rosso levanto top to rear right corner which would benefit from being re-attached. The marble top has great colour. The table has been reduced in depth -as stated in the printed catalogue- although the work has been expertly carried out and is difficult to identify. The stand is re-gilt and the carving of superior quality. Minor chips and losses commensurate with age and use.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Provenance

The collection of Florence Vanderbilt (1854-1952) and Hamilton Twombly (1849-1910);

the by descent until sold Parke Bernet Galleries, New York, The Estate of the late Ruth Vanderbilt Twombly, 6-8 January 1955, lot 322; 

Acquired from Ronald Phillips Ltd., 2008.

Literature

F. Lewis Hinckley, Metropolitan Furniture of the Georgian Years, New York, 1988, p.121, pl.87.

Catalogue Note

This bold table, with its sweeping rocaille frieze and deeply carved foliate detailing, is a fine example of the George III 'Rococo' style that rose to prominence in the 1750s and 60s. The substantial frame was always intended to bear a 'marble slab' which usually consisted of elaborate pietre dure or scagliola tops made for English clients who had returned from their Grand Tours in Italy. For a related George II giltwood side table in the manner of Matthias Lock, circa 1750, see that sold Sotheby's New York, 28 March 2011, lot 155 ($326,500).


The present table formed part of the extraordinary collection of Ruth Vanderbilt Twombly (1885-1954). Ruth was the daughter of the wealthy New York business executive Hamilton McKown Twombly (1877-1910) and railroad heiress Florence Adele Vanderbilt (1854-1952) (the granddaughter of Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt (1794-1877)) who inherited their extensive estates. In the spirit of the times, they maintained a residence in New York, on Fifth Avenue, which was designed by Whitney Warren, as well as “cottages” in the country, which included Vinland at Newport and Florham in Morristown, New Jersey. Florham was nothing short of spectacular. Built in the finest styles of the Gilded Age by one of America’s preeminent architectural firms, McKim, Mead, and White, the 1,200-acre estate encompassed an extraordinary 150 acres of sprawling park of lawns, terraces, and formal gardens designed by renowned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. The 100-room Georgian Revival mansion overlooked these magnificent gardens. Florham now houses the library of the Fairleigh-Dickinson University, New Jersey, whilst the beautiful paneled library of the Fifth Avenue mansion was removed and presented to Cornell University.

STYLE: Private Collections
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