A GEORGE III REVIVAL GILTWOOD OVERMANTEL MIRROR AND CLOCK AFTER A DESIGN BY THOMAS JOHNSON, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
A GEORGE III REVIVAL GILTWOOD OVERMANTEL MIRROR AND CLOCK AFTER A DESIGN BY THOMAS JOHNSON, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
A GEORGE III REVIVAL GILTWOOD OVERMANTEL MIRROR AND CLOCK AFTER A DESIGN BY THOMAS JOHNSON, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
A GEORGE III REVIVAL GILTWOOD OVERMANTEL MIRROR AND CLOCK AFTER A DESIGN BY THOMAS JOHNSON, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
A GEORGE III REVIVAL GILTWOOD OVERMANTEL MIRROR AND CLOCK AFTER A DESIGN BY THOMAS JOHNSON, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
A GEORGE III REVIVAL GILTWOOD OVERMANTEL MIRROR AND CLOCK AFTER A DESIGN BY THOMAS JOHNSON, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY
784

PROPERTY SOLD TO BENEFIT A MARYLAND FOUNDATION

A GEORGE III REVIVAL GILTWOOD OVERMANTEL MIRROR AND CLOCK AFTER A DESIGN BY THOMAS JOHNSON, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 10,000 - 15,000 USD

PROPERTY SOLD TO BENEFIT A MARYLAND FOUNDATION

A GEORGE III REVIVAL GILTWOOD OVERMANTEL MIRROR AND CLOCK AFTER A DESIGN BY THOMAS JOHNSON, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 10,000 - 15,000 USD

Lot Sold:37,500USD

Lot Details

Description

PROPERTY SOLD TO BENEFIT A MARYLAND FOUNDATION


A GEORGE III REVIVAL GILTWOOD OVERMANTEL MIRROR AND CLOCK AFTER A DESIGN BY THOMAS JOHNSON, SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY


approximate height 80 in.; width 9 in.; length 68 in.

203.2 cm; 22.9 cm; 172.7 cm

Condition Report

Scattered minor age cracks and small losses to carved elements throughout, some detached but present. Rubbing, losses, and surface dirt to gilding. Rubbing and tarnishing to steel clock dial. Clock appears to be working but it has not been tested. Please note we do not guarantee clock movements. Highly unusual and rare example of a chippendale style overmantel mirror.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. All dimensions in catalogue descriptions are approximate. Condition reports may not specify mechanical replacements or imperfections to the movement, case, dial, pendulum, separate base(s) or dome. Watches in water-resistant cases have been opened to examine movements but no warranties are made that the watches are currently water-resistant. Please note that we do not guarantee the authenticity of any individual component parts, such as wheels, hands, crowns, crystals, screws, bracelets and leather bands, since subsequent repairs and restoration work may have resulted in the replacement of original parts. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue. In particular, please note it is the purchaser's responsibility to comply with any applicable import and export matters, particularly in relation to lots incorporating materials from endangered species.NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."


**Please be advised that bands made of materials derived from endangered or otherwise protected species (i.e. alligator and crocodile) are not sold with the watches and are for display purposes only. We reserve the right to remove these bands prior to shipping."

Cataloguing

Provenance

Charles Scarlett Jr., Whitehall, Annapolis

Literature

Helena Hayward, Thomas Johnson and English Rococo, London 1964

Catalogue Note

This impressive overmantel mirror is closely based on a design by the London woodcarver, engraver and furniture maker Thomas Johnson, first published in 1758 and subsequently in 1761 as plate 13 of the volume One Hundred and Fifty New Designs. Johnson (1714-1778) was one of the leading proponents of the French-inspired Rococo taste in English decorative arts during the 1750s along with Matthias Lock and Thomas Chippendale, though his work was generally more asymmetrical and fanciful with a greater range of decorative motifs, described by Hayward as ‘the most vigorous and mature expression’ of the rococo style in English furniture.


The present lot follows Johnson’s scheme [Fig. 1] with almost literal precision. The only major modifications are the absence of candle nozzles and the substitution of Chinese figures for the two women harvesting in the original design - suggesting this overmantel may have been intended for a room with Chinese wallpaper or other Chinoiserie-inspired decoration. A revival of interest in the English rococo began in the 1830s, and many of Johnson’s designs were re-published (as Chippendale) by John Weale in 1834, and again in 1846 and 1858.


Whitehall was built for the last governor of the colony of Maryland, Horatio Sharpe, on the Chesapeake Bay east of Annapolis starting in 1763-69, with parkland designed by Capability Brown. Sharpe had little time to enjoy his new house, as he went to London on family business in 1773 and was prevented from returning by the Revolution. The house was sold to Sharpe's former secretary and rival in love John Ridout (Ridout had married Sharpe's intended bride), and remained in the Ridout family until 1895. It then passed through a succession of owners until acquired by the Baltimore businessman Charles Scarlett Jr. in 1946, who completely restored the property and furnished the interiors with historically appropriate fine and decorative arts. The estate is now managed by a foundation with the mission of preserving the house and grounds and supporting educational and conservation initiatives.

STYLE: Furniture, Silver, Ceramics
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