A SET OF TWELVE BERLIN (K.P.M.) PLATES, EARLY 19TH CENTURY
A SET OF TWELVE BERLIN (K.P.M.) PLATES, EARLY 19TH CENTURY
A SET OF TWELVE BERLIN (K.P.M.) PLATES, EARLY 19TH CENTURY
96

A SET OF TWELVE BERLIN (K.P.M.) PLATES, EARLY 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 12,000 - 18,000 GBP

A SET OF TWELVE BERLIN (K.P.M.) PLATES, EARLY 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 12,000 - 18,000 GBP

Lot Sold:17,500GBP

Lot Details

Description

A SET OF TWELVE BERLIN (K.P.M.) PLATES, EARLY 19TH CENTURY


each painted with a botanical study, inscribed in black to the reverse with binomial Latin title and country of origin in French, each well gilt with a band of stylised leaves, the borders in shades of sepia with continuous bands of leaves, underglaze blue sceptre marks, stencilled Prussian eagle and various painter's marks,

Pressnummern 

24.2 cm. diameter

(12)

Condition Report

In overall good condition. Some with a few patches of wear.

Pryus spectabilis has a small scratch to the pale-grey ground in the central well.

Clethra arborea has a few light scratches and a small patch of wear to the central well.

Pryus spectabilis has a small scratch to the pale-grey ground in the central well.

Clethra arborea has a few light scratches and a small patch of wear to the central well

Nymphoea Coereulea and Hibiscus Heterophyllus each with a shallow footrim chip.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

Iris Susiana

Otherwise known as the Chalcedonian or mourning iris, see Linneus, Species Plantarum 1 : 38


Iris Florentina

Common names include: Florentine Iris', 'Florentine Flag','Glaive lily', 'White German Iris', and 'White Flower De Luce. It was first published and described by Carl Linnaeus, in Systema Naturae Edition 10, Issue2 on p. 863 on 7 June 1759, as Iris florentina


Pyrus Spectabilis Chine

Known as the Chinese Apple Tree and thought to have been introduced to Europe in the 18th century and regarded as one of the most beautiful trees of an ornamental plantation. It was first published by Moritz Balthasar Borkhausen in his book Theorisch-praktisches Handbuch der Forstbotanik und Forsttechnologie, 1803


Clethra Arborea

Sometimes known as the lily-of-the-valley tree, it is a native of the Azores and Madeira


Kennedia Rubicundae

Its common name is the Dusky Coral Pea, it is a native of eastern Australia. It was first published in 1793 by Dutch botanist, George Voorhelm Schneevoogt under the later rejected name of Glycine rubicunda (Dingy-flowered Glycine) in Icones Plantarum Rariorum. In 1804 it was published under its current name by French botanist Étienne Pierre Ventenat in Jardin de la Malmaison


Rhexia Sarmentosa

First recorded by French explorer and botanist Aimé Bonpland and Prussian polymath Alexander von Humboldt during their five year exploration of South America (1799-1804)


Nymphoea Coereulea

Sometimes known as the Blue Egyptian lotus, it, along with the white variety is depicted in ancient Egyptian art and owing to its mildly sedative effects may be the plant consumed by the lotophagi or Lotus Eaters in Homer’s Odyssey


Hibiscus Heterophyllus

Known as Native Rosella, is endemic to rainforest areas of Eastern Australia.


Hypericum Pyramidatum 

Commonly known as Great St John’s Wort, it is found in North America and Asia


Lavatera Phoenicea

Today this tree mallow is known as the Salmon-red Canary Shrub Mallow, reflecting its origins in Tenerife


Amaryllis Atamasco

This `rain-lily` was named by Linneus in his second edition of Species Plantarum using the Native American `Atamasco`, it was re-categorised by William Herbert in 1821 retaining this later spelling.


Cypripedium Calceolus

Known as `Lady’s Slipper` orchid, its name derives from the Greek, literally Venus’s foot and the Latin `calceolus` for a small shoe. This is the largest variety of orchid in Europe.


STYLE: European Silver, Gold Boxes and Ceramics
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