EXCEPTIONAL RED-PAINTED MODEL OF THE 'HOPE' HAND PUMPER FIRE ENGINE, ROBERT EICHHOLTZ (1833-1912) AND HENRY EICHHOLTZ (1830-1918), LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, 1854
EXCEPTIONAL RED-PAINTED MODEL OF THE 'HOPE' HAND PUMPER FIRE ENGINE, ROBERT EICHHOLTZ (1833-1912) AND HENRY EICHHOLTZ (1830-1918), LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, 1854
EXCEPTIONAL RED-PAINTED MODEL OF THE 'HOPE' HAND PUMPER FIRE ENGINE, ROBERT EICHHOLTZ (1833-1912) AND HENRY EICHHOLTZ (1830-1918), LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, 1854
EXCEPTIONAL RED-PAINTED MODEL OF THE 'HOPE' HAND PUMPER FIRE ENGINE, ROBERT EICHHOLTZ (1833-1912) AND HENRY EICHHOLTZ (1830-1918), LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, 1854
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EXCEPTIONAL RED-PAINTED MODEL OF THE 'HOPE' HAND PUMPER FIRE ENGINE, ROBERT EICHHOLTZ (1833-1912) AND HENRY EICHHOLTZ (1830-1918), LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, 1854

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 USD

EXCEPTIONAL RED-PAINTED MODEL OF THE 'HOPE' HAND PUMPER FIRE ENGINE, ROBERT EICHHOLTZ (1833-1912) AND HENRY EICHHOLTZ (1830-1918), LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, 1854

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 USD

Lot Sold:40,000USD

Lot Details

Description

EXCEPTIONAL RED-PAINTED MODEL OF THE 'HOPE' HAND PUMPER FIRE ENGINE, ROBERT EICHHOLTZ (1833-1912) AND HENRY EICHHOLTZ (1830-1918), LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA, 1854


model of a Philadelphia-style double decker end-stroke hand pumper with iron brakes intersecting the condenser case, a brass suction outlet is in the center of one side and on the other side, a brass discharge, folding wood platforms, on which men stood to reach the upper brakes, extend across the top of the body, brass fluting and engraved plaques decorate the top of the condenser case, topped by a rounded brass dome, a brass plaque on each side of the body one with interlocking design with 1854 and Eicholz Bros, and Hope on the other with a heart, a crowned king, woman and nude couple.

Height 23 ½ in. by Depth 37 in. by Width 15 in.

Condition Report

Metal rod loose.


To request further information for this lot, please email americana@sothebys.com. Please note, however, detailed condition reports and photographs will be available starting September 30th after property arrives at Sotheby’s.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Cataloguing

Provenance

Mutual Assurance Company, Philadelphia;

Schwartz Gallery, Philadelphia;

Giampietro American Folk Art, New Haven, Connecticut.

Literature

Anthony N.B. Garvan and Carol A. Wojtowicz, Catalogue of the Green Tree Collection, (Philadelphia, PA: Mutual Assurance Co., 1977), pp. 124-4;

The Green Tree: Highlights from the Collection of the Mutual Assurance Company of Philadelphia, cat. 78. (Philadelphia, PA: Schwartz Gallery, 2007), p. 23, no. 10.

Catalogue Note

This fire engine model was made in 1854 by Robert (1833-1912) and Henry Eichholcz (1830-1918) of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, sons of the noted ponraicist Jacob Eichholcz ( 1776-1842). The elder Eichholtz painted decorations for a volunteer fire company in Lancaster of which he had been a member. This model represents a Philadelphia-style, double­decker end-stroke hand-pumper with an octagonal condenser case. Garvan and Wojtowicz tentatively identified it as one that the Hope Engine Company of Philadelphia sold to an unknown buyer in 1854. That engine was known to have had a square condenser case, but it may have been altered to the octagonal form during extensive repairs. They also conjectured that the "Hope" was originally conceived as an artist's ideal of a fire engine. Although the model's small size suggests that it was a child's toy, they concluded that "the engraving on the plaques is too exotic for a toy and more in keeping with a men's club." Garvan and Wojtowicz also noted that the engraved ornamentation on the model was similar to that found on guns, and that the Eichholtz brothers were experienced gunsmiths.

Sculptural Fantasy: The Important American Folk Art Collection of Stephen and Petra Levin
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