View full screen - View 1 of Lot 159. A PAIR OF BERLIN (K.P.M.) PORCELAIN VASES, CIRCA 1830.
159

A PAIR OF BERLIN (K.P.M.) PORCELAIN VASES, CIRCA 1830

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 15,000 GBP

A PAIR OF BERLIN (K.P.M.) PORCELAIN VASES, CIRCA 1830

A PAIR OF BERLIN (K.P.M.) PORCELAIN VASES, CIRCA 1830

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 15,000 GBP

Lot sold:

15,000

GBP

A PAIR OF BERLIN (K.P.M.) PORCELAIN VASES, CIRCA 1830


of Krater form, known as Rhedensche Vasen, painted to both sides with named views, one of Das Schlofs zu Berlin von der/Burgstrafse aus gesehen. and Das Zeughaus zu Berlin., the other with Das Brandenburger Thor in Berlin and Durchfahrt zur neuen Wilhelms_Strafse in Berlin., within rectangular gilt cartouches tooled with palmettes, divided by pale-grey-ground panels gilt with foliage below similar bands, the richly-gilt sections tooled with bands of stiff-leaves, acanthus and scrolling leaves and flowers, the stem decorated to simulate gadrooning on a tooled vermicular pattern ground, the interior of the rims tooled with bands of harebells, each supported by a square base, blue sceptre and stencilled eagle and KPM marks, painter's marks   

31.5cm. high, 12¼ in.

The condition report is currently unavailable. Please email Florence.Flood@sothebys.com to request a report.

Das Brabdenburger Thor in Berlin was inspired by Greek classical architecture and was envisaged as a symbol of peace when commissioned by Friedrich Wilhelm II from the Royal architect, Carl Gotthard Langhans. It is surmounted by a chariot group, the Quadriga, which was removed by Napoleon in 1806 and redesigned by Schinkel following its return in 1814 as a symbol of Victory. It is popularly represented on Berlin porcelain ornamental and useful wares. Das Zeughaus zu Berlin in Unter den Linden was built as an armory between 1695 and 1730, by 1875 it housed a museum of military history and today is a museum of German history. Das Schloss zu Berlin von der Burgstrasse aus gesehen is a view of the Kurfürstengalierie, part of the refurbishment by Friedrich Wilhelm, the Great Elelctor, following the Thirty Years’ War. The façade which runs along the Spree connects Duchess Elisabeth's House and the SchlossapothekeDurchfahrt zur neuen Wilhelms Strasse in Berlin shows the façade extended to Schinkel’s design.