MARK HOGANCAMP | SAVING THE MAJOR
MARK HOGANCAMP | SAVING THE MAJOR
172

MARK HOGANCAMP | SAVING THE MAJOR

Estimate: 10,000 - 15,000 USD

MARK HOGANCAMP | SAVING THE MAJOR

Estimate: 10,000 - 15,000 USD

Lot Details

Description

MARK HOGANCAMP

B. 1962

SAVING THE MAJOR


mural-sized digital chromogenic print, framed, 2006, printed in 2019, no. 3 in an edition of 3 plus 2 artist’s proofs; accompanied by a signed Certificate of Authenticity (2)

48 by 72 in. (121.9 by 182.9 cm.)

Condition Report

This photograph is in generally excellent condition. The colors are bright and saturated, with no signs of fading.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

On 8 April 2000, Mark Hogancamp was attacked by five men and left for dead outside of a bar in Kingston, New York. After nine days in a coma, he awoke with no memories and had to relearn how to eat, walk, and write. When his state-sponsored rehabilitative therapies ran out, Hogancamp took his recovery into his own hands. In his backyard, he created a new world entirely within his control — a 1: 6 scale World War II town he named Marwencol. Using doll alter egos for friends, family, his attackers, and himself, Hogancamp enacted epic battles and recreated fragmented memories, which he captured in photographs. So strikingly realistic and emotionally intense that they are frequently mistaken for photographs of actual soldiers in action, these images eventually caught the eye of the art world, which lead to a series of gallery exhibitions, the award-winning documentary 'Marwencol,' the acclaimed book 'Welcome to Marwencol,' and the 2018 feature-length film 'Welcome to Marwen' starring Steve Carell.

Photographs
Online bidding closed