MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE | 'GARGOYLE, CHRYSLER BUILDING, N. Y. C.'
MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE | 'GARGOYLE, CHRYSLER BUILDING, N. Y. C.'
MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE | 'GARGOYLE, CHRYSLER BUILDING, N. Y. C.'
137

MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE | 'GARGOYLE, CHRYSLER BUILDING, N. Y. C.'

Estimate: 250,000 - 350,000 USD

MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE | 'GARGOYLE, CHRYSLER BUILDING, N. Y. C.'

Estimate: 250,000 - 350,000 USD

Description

MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE

1904-1971

'GARGOYLE, CHRYSLER BUILDING, N. Y. C.'


oversized, warm-toned, with title and annotation 'Mid-winter 1929-30' and 'Her Studio on 61st Floor Where Gargoyles Situated' in pencil on the reverse, framed, circa1930

19 by 13⅝ in. (48.3 by 34.6 cm.)

Condition Report

This astonishing, warm-toned, large early print, on double-weight paper with a pebbled surface, is in generally excellent condition.


When examined very closely in raking light, there is a very small, slightly raised 'bump' in the lower central portion of the print. The photograph is somewhat unevenly trimmed, particularly at the right and left margin edges. The margin corners are slightly bumped, and there is light soiling in the margins and on the reverse. None of the aforementioned detracts from the otherwise fine appearance of this extraordinary print.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Provenance

The photographer to a private collector, 1970 

Edwynn Houk Gallery, Chicago

Collection of the Gilman Paper Company, acquired from the above, 1988

Sotheby's New York, Important Photographs from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Works from the Gilman Paper Company, 5 February 2006, Lot 21

Literature

Lee D. Witkin, A Ten Year Salute: A Selection of Photographs in Celebration, The Witkin Gallery, 1969-1979 (Danbury, New Hampshire, 1979), p. 103 

Jonathan Silverman, For the World to See: The Life of Margaret Bourke-White (New York, 1983), p. 58

Therese Mulligan and David Wooters, eds., Photography from 1839 to Today: George Eastman House, Rochester, NY (Köln, 2000), p. 588

David Stravitz, The Chrysler Building: Creating a New York Icon, Day by Day (New York, 2002), p. X

Stephen Bennett Phillips, Margaret Bourke-White: The Photography of Design 1927-1936 (The Phillips Collection, 2003), p. 11

Catalogue Note

In 1930, Margaret Bourke-White was commissioned by the Chrysler Corporation to photograph their new, 77-story, 1,046-foot skyscraper, while it was still under construction. In her autobiography, Portrait of Myself, Bourke-White says of her first glimpse of the Chrysler Building gargoyles, ‘On the sixty-first floor, the workmen started building some curious structures which overhung 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue below. When I learned these were to be gargoyles à la Notre Dame, but made of stainless steel as more suitable for the twentieth century, I decided that here would be my new studio. There was no place in the world that I would accept as a substitute. I was ready to close my studio in Cleveland in order to be nearer Fortune, but it was the gargoyles which gave me the final spurt to New York’ (p. 78).


When the building’s landlord expressed doubt about renting such prime real estate to a woman, in what was then, briefly, the tallest building in the world, her employer Fortune magazine intervened on her behalf. Later that year, Bourke-White moved into her new Chrysler Building studio, and she remained there until early 1933. It was from this space on the southeast side of the Chrysler Building that she photographed one of the two imposing gargoyles accessible to her. She grew so fond of the colossal art deco beasts that she named them Min and Bill, and they kept company with Bourke-White’s two pet alligators who resided outside on one of the studio’s balconies. 


The adventurous Bourke-White often delighted in climbing out onto the gargoyles themselves, 800 feet above the street, to photograph Manhattan (fig. 1). Designed by Chesley Bonestell and inspired by the 1929 Chrysler Plymouth hood ornament, these monumental gargoyles were among the many automotive-themed ornaments to adorn the new building, including hubcaps, mudguards, winged radiator caps, and stylized cars.

The panoramic view afforded from atop the Chrysler Building has continued to inspire artists over the ensuing decades. In 1991, Annie Leibovitz followed in Bourke-White’s footsteps to photograph dancer David Parsons draped across the length of a gleaming gargoyle. Bruce McCall’s May 2000 cover of The New Yorker payed witty homage to Bourke-White, depicting the photographer lifted midair by a gargoyle come-to-life.


At the time of this writing, it is believed that only one other print of this image in this impressive large format has been offered at auction.

MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE | 'GARGOYLE, CHRYSLER BUILDING, N. Y. C.'
MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE | 'GARGOYLE, CHRYSLER BUILDING, N. Y. C.'
Lot Closed