IRVING PENN | 'FISHMONGER', LONDON, 1950
IRVING PENN | 'FISHMONGER', LONDON, 1950
IRVING PENN | 'FISHMONGER', LONDON, 1950
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IRVING PENN | 'FISHMONGER', LONDON, 1950

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 GBP

IRVING PENN | 'FISHMONGER', LONDON, 1950

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 GBP

Lot Sold:37,500GBP

Lot Details

Description

IRVING PENN

1917 – 2009

'FISHMONGER', LONDON, 1950 


Platinum-palladium print, printed 1967. Signed, titled, dated, numbered 19/34 and P172 and annotated in pencil, with the Penn/Condé Nast copyright credit reproduction limitation and edition stamps on the verso. Matted and framed.

Image 50 x 37.5 cm (19⅝x 14¾in.);

sheet 57 x 45.5 cm (22½x 17⅞in.)

Condition Report

This platinum print is in overall excellent condition. Velvety print. Framed by John Jones with ultraviolet filtering and low reflective Acrylic.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE.

Cataloguing

Provenance

Private collection, UK

Hamiltons Gallery, London 

Literature

Virginia A. Heckert and Anne Lacoste, Irving Penn Small Trades, J. Paul Getty Museum, 2009, reproduced on full page pl.195

Catalogue Note

This powerful platinum print belongs to Penn’s series Small Trades, which he began photographing in 1950 in London, Paris and New York. He sought to document trades that would eventually disappear and as a result this body of work stands as a historical piece of the mid-20th century. The portraits were executed in the same simple manner as his fashion works were conducted. Penn welcomed to his atelier the subjects, who had previously been scouted by his assistant, and captured them in their full work attire accompanied by tools of their occupation.

Photographs
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