LORENZO LIPPI | Portrait of a young woman, probably Margherita Galli, in the guise of Saint Margaret | 洛倫索・利皮 | 《年輕女子肖像,應為瑪格麗塔・加利妝成聖瑪加利大》
LORENZO LIPPI | Portrait of a young woman, probably Margherita Galli, in the guise of Saint Margaret | 洛倫索・利皮 | 《年輕女子肖像,應為瑪格麗塔・加利妝成聖瑪加利大》
15

Property from a European Private Collection | 歐洲私人收藏

LORENZO LIPPI | Portrait of a young woman, probably Margherita Galli, in the guise of Saint Margaret | 洛倫索・利皮 | 《年輕女子肖像,應為瑪格麗塔・加利妝成聖瑪加利大》

Estimate: 50,000 - 70,000 GBP

Property from a European Private Collection | 歐洲私人收藏

LORENZO LIPPI | Portrait of a young woman, probably Margherita Galli, in the guise of Saint Margaret | 洛倫索・利皮 | 《年輕女子肖像,應為瑪格麗塔・加利妝成聖瑪加利大》

Estimate: 50,000 - 70,000 GBP

Lot Sold:62,500GBP

Lot Details

Description

Property from a European Private Collection

歐洲私人收藏

LORENZO LIPPI

洛倫索・利皮

Florence 1606 - 1665

1606 - 1665年,佛羅倫薩

Portrait of a young woman, probably Margherita Galli, in the guise of Saint Margaret

《年輕女子肖像,應為瑪格麗塔・加利妝成聖瑪加利大》


oil on canvas

油彩畫布

88 x 75 cm.; 34¾ x 29½ in.

油彩畫布

Condition Report

The canvas is sensitively lined. The paint surface is secure and stable with no major damage visible to the naked eye. The varnish appears clear and even. There is a slight degree of thinning of the paint in the pale tones of the young woman's flesh where the ground shows through slightly, and in the gauze-like veil across her chest. Otherwise the bold colours remain vibrant. Inspection under ultra violet light reveals some well executed retouchings scattered in the face, the touches in the forehead and collar bone are the most notable, others seemingly just to mast the pattern of craquelure. There are further retoucings in her hands: a concentrated area of restoration in the back of her left hand and wrist measuring approx. 3 inches in length; and further strengthenings in the shadows of the palm of her right hand and wrist. There are other small scattered retouchings in the robes and a larger amount thoughout the dark background.

Overall in fair condition: well presented with no further work required.

Offered in a carved and gesso gilt and black wood frame in good condition.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Provenance

Possibly Agnolo Galli, Palazzo Galli, Via Pandolfini, Florence;

Anonymous sale, London, Sotheby's, 7 December 2006, lot 209, for £78,000.

Literature

F. Baldassari, La Pittura del Seicento a Firenze, Indice degli Artisti e delle loro Opere, Turin 2009, p. 448.

Catalogue Note

For much of his early career Lorenzo Lippi was apprenticed in the workshop of Matteo Rosselli, along with other painters such as Baldassare Franceschini, called il Volterrano, and Jacopo Vignali. Lippi did not open his own independent practice until 1634 and continued working in association with Rosselli until at least 1640. He was considered one of the principal painters in mid-seventeenth century Florence and was greatly esteemed by contemporaries, in particular his friend and biographer Filippo Baldinucci (1681–1728).


The beautiful sitter is possibly identifiable with one of the daughters of Agnolo Galli, who were depicted in Lippi's Triumph of David, dating from 1656, published by Chiara D'Afflitto as in a private collection, Florence.1 In the Florentine painting the sitter can be seen wearing the same clothes that she wears in the present work, playing the flute in the second row of maidens. This portrait, so characteristic of Lippi's ability to capture both physiognomy and psychological insight, formed part of a series of five or six pictures commissioned by Agnolo Galli in about 1656, depicting his daughters in the guise of saints and may be compared to the Saint Elisabeth of Hungary (of the same dimensions), which was listed by D'Afflitto as formerly with Giancarlo Baroni, Paris.2 While the animal depicted has been identified as a bear (and thus would make the sitter more likely to be shown in the guise of Saint Ursula), D'Afflitto described it as a dog, which is the traditional attribute of Saint Margaret of Cortona.3 


The painting is accompanied by Chiara D'Afflitto's written expertise (available on request). She dates the picture to the second half of the 1650s.


1 C. D'Afflitto, Lorenzo Lippi, Florence 2002, pp. 297–98, no. 123, reproduced.

2 D'Afflitto 2002, p. 299, no. 124, reproduced.

3 Not to be confused with the more famous Saint Margaret of Antioch, whose traditional attribute is a dragon.

Old Masters Evening Sale | 西洋古典油畫晚拍
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