AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608), PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY | LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE
AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608), PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY | LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE
AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608), PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY | LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE
AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608), PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY | LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE
AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608), PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY | LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE
AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608), PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY | LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE
AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608), PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY | LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE
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AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608), PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY | LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE

Estimate: 18,000 - 25,000 GBP

AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608), PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY | LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE

Estimate: 18,000 - 25,000 GBP

Lot Details

Description

AFTER GIAMBOLOGNA (1529-1608)

PROBABLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN, 17TH/ EARLY 18TH CENTURY

LION ATTACKING A BULL AND LION ATTACKING A HORSE


bronze, on gilt metal mounted veined black and cream marble bases

the Lion attacking a Horse after a Hellenistic original;

the Lion and Horse inscribed: 18652B and: 137-1 to the underside, and each base incised: CC51 to the underside, one with remnants of a label

bronzes: 20 by 27cm., 7⅞ by 10⅝in. and 21.5 by 25cm., 8½ by 9⅞in.

bases: 10.5 by 27 by 26cm., 4⅛ by 10⅝ by 10¼in. each

Condition Report

Overall the condition of the bronzes is good, with some wear and dirt to the surfaces consistent with age. There are several stable original reinforced casting fissures or joints, notably at the the horse's proper left hind leg, haunches, and chest, and the lion's haunches in this group. There are joints with evidence of soldering also at the bull's hind legs. There are a few small original lacunae. There is wear to the lacquer patina, including some light staining notably to the horse group, probably from moisture.

The bases are in overall good condition with general wear, including chips along the edges and some tarnishing to the gilding. The upper metal mount of one of the bases is loose and slightly uneven. The bronzes are loose on the bases.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

The present bronze casts, with slightly rough, textured surfaces and various casting flaws, are reminiscent of casts by Anglo-Italian sculptor Francesco Fanelli, active in the first half of the 17th century. Compare to a Rearing Horse, sold in these rooms, 2 July 2019, lot 65. The delineation of the lion's fur on the group with the horse could however indicate a possible German facture - the technique for indicating hair with precise horizontal incisions was practised in Renaissance Augsburg, and continued into the 17th century. Comparison for these striated surfaces can also be found in works by the Master of the Bull Hunt, the enigmatic master of Baroque small scale sculpture. In a recent article on the Master, Jennifer Montagu highlights the use of these surfaces in the Master's work. The Master of the Bull Hunt, however, is yet to be identified: although Montagu proposes a Sicilian origin, he is traditionally said to have been Northern European or possibly English (op. cit., pp. 103-111). 


RELATED LITERATURE

J. Montagu, 'The Master of the Bull Hunt: An Enigma', in J. Warren (ed.), Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes in and around the Peter Marino Collection, London, 2013, pp. 96-113

Old Master Sculpture & Works of Art
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