GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron
GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron
GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron
GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron
GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron
GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron
494

Property from the Collection of Dr. Susan Weber

GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron

Estimate: 80,000 - 120,000 USD

Property from the Collection of Dr. Susan Weber

GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron

Estimate: 80,000 - 120,000 USD

Lot Sold:200,000USD

Lot Details

Description

Property from the Collection of Dr. Susan Weber

GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS

黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron


Depicting Fortuna, the Roman goddess of fortune and good luck, applied with polychrome enamel, seated on a globe composed of a circular fancy-cut diamond, holding a cornucopia, within an elaborate architectural surround applied with further enamel, with carved amethyst columns, and cabochon rubies, emeralds and sapphires, surmounted and suspending white and gray pearls, the reverse with enamel detail, signed Fic Boucheron, Paris, with French assay and partial workshop marks; circa 1880. With a fitted Wartski case.


Please note that the pearls have not been tested for natural origin.

Condition Report

In very good condition, especially given the age of the piece. Mounted in 18 karat gold. Signature located on the reverse. French assay and partial workshop marks on brooch fitting and on the side of the gold platform on which the apse rests. The diamond, measuring approximately 11.00 x 11.00 x 4.6 mm, is of light yellow hue, approximately VS-SI clarity. Exquisite use of polychrome enamel in a variety of rich hues. Amethyst columns in excellent condition. The drop-shaped pearl of grey body color measuring approximately 6.2 x 6.2 x 7.8 mm; the drop-shaped pearls of white body color measuring approximately 4.5 x 4.5 x 5.3 mm; the round pearls of white body color, atop the finials, measuring approximately 3.1 mm. The ruby, emerald and sapphire cabochons in very good condition, with vivid saturations and characteristic inclusions visible under 10x magnification. Brooch-pendant measuring approximately 3 inches in length and 1⅜ inches in width. Pendant hook is designed as a hook and not designed to close. Please note that the pearls have not been tested for natural origin.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion. Illustrations in the catalogue may not be actual size. Prospective purchasers are reminded that, unless the catalogue description specifically states that a stone is natural, we have assumed that some form of treatment may have been used and that such treatment may not be permanent. Our presale estimates reflect this assumption.Certificates of Authenticity: Various manufacturers may not issue certificates of authenticity upon request. Sotheby's is not under an obligation to furnish the purchaser with a certificate of authenticity from the manufacturer at any time. Unless the requirements for a rescission of the sale under the Terms of Guarantee are satisfied, the failure of a manufacturer to issue a certificate will not constitute grounds to rescind the sale. Gemological Certificates and Reports: References in the catalogue descriptions to certificates or reports issued by gemological laboratories are provided only for the information of bidders, and Sotheby's does not guarantee and accepts no responsibility for the accuracy, terms or information contained in such certificates or reports. Please also note that laboratories may differ in their assessment of a gemstone (including its origin and presence, type and extent of treatments) and their certificates or reports may contain different results.NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Cataloguing

Provenance

Sotheby's London, June 13, 2000, Antique Jewels, lot 190.

Literature

David Bennett and Daniela Mascetti. Understanding Jewellery, Antique Collectors' Club, 1989, plate 225, p. 80.

Charlotte Gere and Judy Rudoe, Jewellery in the Age of Queen Victoria, 2010, ch. 7, fig. 324, page 361.

Yvonne Hackenbroch, Renaissance Jewellery, London, 1979, pages 159-160.

Katherine Purcell, Falize: A Dynasty of Jewellers, London, 1999, page 71, no. 96 and page 237.

Catalogue Note

The brooch offered here was created by Maison Boucheron at a moment in the late 19th century when historical revivalism had flourished to its fullest extent. Renaissance revivalism echoed the past greatness of France in recurrent themes and styles derived from sixteenth century painting, sculpture and architecture. Models for jewels were inspired by ornament prints of the late fifteenth century forward, and these prints were popular collectibles, especially for jewelers. In the 1830s and ‘40s, French goldsmiths created romantic, sculptural jewels inspired by Gothic architecture, as can be seen in François-Désiré Froment-Meurice’s brooch “Harmony” around 1847 which features a divine figure playing a musical instrument accompanied by putti within an architectural setting. This was also a period of the revival of various techniques of painted enameling such as en ronde bosse, champlevé, émail translucide, and émail cabochonné, as well as painted enamels of pictorial scenes. Enameling was most highly regarded in France, and Paris was considered the great modern school of enamel. Other French firms that created examples in Renaissance revival style emphasizing the use of enamel included Falize, Wièse, Fannière Frères, Fouquet and Teterger.  


In 1867 Frédéric Boucheron won a Grand Prize at the Paris Exhibition for his jewels in both the archaeological revival and Renaissance revival styles, and in 1876 the French government presented Boucheron with a Legion of Honor award for his creations. His contemporary Henri Vever, both a jeweler and noted jewelry historian commented: “Boucheron made pieces that very few of his colleagues would have dared to make at the time.” In this jewel, Boucheron designed a brooch which encompasses all the prevailing trends in French jewelry design of the late 19th century, and it is imbued with rich symbolism that can be noted in several details. This small enameled sculpture of the ancient Roman goddess Fortuna is a tour-de-force of the genre. Although possibly never intended to be worn but displayed as an objet de vitrine, the central figure of Fortuna boldly enameled en ronde bosse in crimson and white, is portrayed with her identifying attributes; the wheel on which she sits (in this case, a large circular fancy-cut diamond) symbolizes that luck, good or bad, never lasts, and the cornucopia she holds is the source of good and plenty, overflowing with precious gemstones. The columns flanking her are formed of carved amethyst which is a gemstone of spiritual protection and purification, and these are supported by bases set with cabochon sapphires which not only represent power and strength, but sapphires are also symbols of kindness and wise judgment. Suspended below and set in the jardinères on either side of the apse above are pearls, which are regarded as symbols of hidden knowledge.


Specific sources of inspiration for this superb jewel are most probably the architectural and figurative pendants of Erasmus Hornick, a goldsmith from Antwerp active in Augsburg in the second half of the 18th century, such as those illustrated in Yvonne Hackenbroc’s Renaissance Jewellery where the mythological figures are surrounded by elaborate architectural frameworks. The figure of Fortuna and the symbolism central to this jewel are also the subject of a contemporary pendant in Renaissance revival style created by Falize, after a design by Virgil Solis of Nuremberg dated 1560. 

GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron
Property from the Collection of Dr. Susan Weber
GOLD, ENAMEL, DIAMOND AND GEM-SET PENDANT-BROOCH, BOUCHERON, PARIS | 黃金配琺瑯彩、鑽石及寶石吊墜 / 別針,Boucheron
Lot Closed