JOHN LATHAM | UNTITLED
234

JOHN LATHAM | UNTITLED

Estimate: 3,000 - 5,000 GBP

JOHN LATHAM | UNTITLED

Estimate: 3,000 - 5,000 GBP

Lot Sold:6,250GBP

Lot Details

Description

JOHN LATHAM

1921-2006

UNTITLED


indistinctly signed, dated Nov 1962 and inscribed on the reverse

oil on canvas laid on board with collaged book

68.5 by 61.5 by 22cm.; 27 by 24¼ by 8½in.

Condition Report

There are traces of loss and lifting to the applied plaster and paint impasto to one side of the book element in the centre of the composition, with further minor areas of cracking to the black paint, and to the joins at the corners apparent upon closer inspection. There is a further tiny fleck of loss to the plaster at the point at which the book meets the canvas support. There is minor surface dirt and studio detritus to the canvas support, but this excepting the work appears in good overall condition.


The work is unframed.


Please telephone the department on +44 (0) 207 293 6424 if you have any questions regarding the present work.

Cataloguing

Provenance

Acquired directly from the Artist by Charles H. Carpenter Jr, and thence by descent to the previous owner

Acquired by the present owner in 2014

Catalogue Note

The present work was completed during the three months Latham spent in New York in the early 1960s. During this time he stayed at the historic Chelsea Hotel, infamous as a hotspot of the artistic world, hosting (amongst many others) the likes of Bob Dylan, Stanley Kubrick, Edie Sedgwick, Janis Joplin, Allen Ginsberg, and Arthur C. Clarke, who wrote 2001: A Space Odyssey while a resident. Latham became acquainted with other important artists of the day while staying at the hotel, such as Robert Rauschenberg, Willem de Kooning, Andy Warhol and the renowned American art critic Clement Greenberg, who was to become an incredibly significant figure in Latham’s work in the following decade. Latham was highly stimulated by the diversity and energy of New York, and the artistic bubble of the Chelsea Hotel. He held an informal exhibition and produced a considerable quantity of works whilst staying there, many of which have subsequently gone missing.

Made in Britain
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