REUVEN RUBIN | WHITE LILAC
REUVEN RUBIN | WHITE LILAC
REUVEN RUBIN | WHITE LILAC
35

Property from a Private Collection in Israel

REUVEN RUBIN | WHITE LILAC

Estimate: 50,000 - 70,000 USD

Property from a Private Collection in Israel

REUVEN RUBIN | WHITE LILAC

Estimate: 50,000 - 70,000 USD

Lot Sold:62,500USD

Lot Details

Description

Property from a Private Collection in Israel

REUVEN RUBIN

Israeli

1893 - 1974

WHITE LILAC


signed Rubin, signed in Hebrew (lower left); signed Rubin, signed in Hebrew, titled White Lilac and dated 1965 (on the stretcher)

painted in 1965

oil on canvas

28 by 19 in.

71.2 by 48.3 cm.


This work is accompanied by a certificated of authenticity from Carmela Rubin of the Rubin Museum Foundation. 

Condition Report

This work is in very good condition. There are some abrasions along the bottom edge, scattered craquelure mainly around the table area and a spot of craquelure by the center of the right edge. This work is not relined. No retouching is apparent when viewed under ultra violet light.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Cataloguing

Provenance

Sale: Tiroche Auctions, Hertzliya, January  25, 2014, lot 99

Purchased from the above by the present owner

Catalogue Note

Early in his career, Reuven Rubin began to paint flowers and continued throughout the years. Rubin took great pleasure in the diversity of colors, scents and shapes, but his interest in depicting them as a main subject only occurred after his wife Esther arrived in the country. “They would return from their country-side outings with bunches of wild flowers and she would carefully arrange them in bowls and vases in his home, so that he was always conscious of their beauty... with the years, his handling of flower pieces has grown freer, with more emphasis on vibrance of color than on shape of individual flowers...” (Sarah Wilkinson, Reuven Rubin, New York, 1974, p. 60). 

Israeli and International Art
Online bidding closed