REUVEN RUBIN | WELL IN THE OLIVE FOREST
REUVEN RUBIN | WELL IN THE OLIVE FOREST
REUVEN RUBIN | WELL IN THE OLIVE FOREST
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REUVEN RUBIN | WELL IN THE OLIVE FOREST

Estimate: 60,000 - 80,000 USD

REUVEN RUBIN | WELL IN THE OLIVE FOREST

Estimate: 60,000 - 80,000 USD

Lot Sold:62,500USD

Lot Details

Description

REUVEN RUBIN

Israeli

1893 - 1974

WELL IN THE OLIVE FOREST


signed Rubin and signed in Hebrew (lower left); signed Rubin, signed in Hebrew, titled Well in the Olive Forest and dated 1937 MADE IN ISRAEL (on the stretcher)

painted in 1937

oil on canvas

23 by 28 in.

58.5 by 71 cm.

This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Carmela Rubin of the Rubin Museum Foundation.

Condition Report

This work is in very good condition. The canvas is not relined. There is minor craquelure mainly in the sky area and a few scattered areas of retouching mainly by top edge of the work are apparent when viewed under ultra violet light.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

Alfred Werner discusses the influence of Rembrandt's impasto techniques and the manner of the Impressionists on Rubin's work in the 1930s: “There was to be noted a growing tendency towards fuller and stronger colour, greater textural weight and more visible movement... He who had been nature's master, re-arranging, abbreviating or distorting at will for the sake of pictorial unity, now permitted himself to be influenced into a quasi-impressionism by the silver colour of the trees guarding a winding road, or by a town on a hill viewed through misty veils of lights. The ancient olive trees became an untiring subject for Rubin and absorbed him with their form and their light, and in the opinion of outstanding critics of contemporary art, during the past years he has evolved an almost abstract conception of the subject, which the art world today readily recognizes as a distinct personal contribution,” (Alfred Werner, Rubin, Tel Aviv, 1958, pp. 8-9). 

Israeli and International Art
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