CARL HAAG | THE DOME OF THE ROCK, JERUSALEM
CARL HAAG | THE DOME OF THE ROCK, JERUSALEM
40

CARL HAAG | THE DOME OF THE ROCK, JERUSALEM

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 GBP

3940

CARL HAAG | THE DOME OF THE ROCK, JERUSALEM

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 GBP

Lot Sold:71,250GBP

Lot Details

Description

CARL HAAG

German

1820 - 1915

THE DOME OF THE ROCK, JERUSALEM


signed and dated Carl Haag1863 lower centre on the wall alongside the steps

watercolour on paper

33 by 57cm., 13 by 22½in.

Condition Report

For the Condition Reports please contact the department on Benedetta.Pedrana@Sothebys.com or 0044 20 7293 6206

Cataloguing

Provenance

Mathaf Gallery, London (by 1984)

Purchased from the above

Exhibited

London, Mathaf Gallery, Spring Exhibition, Important Orientalist Paintings of the 19th Century, 1984, illustrated in the catalogue

Literature

Caroline Juler, Najd Collection of Orientalist Paintings, London, 1991, p. 168, catalogued & illustrated

Martina Haja & Günter Wimmer, Les Orientalistes des écoles allemandes et autrichiennes, Courbevoie, 2000, p. 84-85, catalogued & illustrated

Catalogue Note

The Dome of the Rock, one of the oldest extant works of Islamic architecture, is among the holiest shrines in Islam, situated on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem. According to Islamic tradition, the site marks the spot from which the Prophet Muhammad ascended to heaven. 


Haag's view is from the nearby Al-Aqsa mosque just to the south, whose main ablution fountain, known as al-Kas ('the Cup'), is seen in the centre of the composition. Worshippers use the fountain to perform wudu, a ritual washing of the hands, arms, legs, feet, and face before entry into the mosque. It was first built in 709 by the Umayyads, but in 1327–28 Governor Tankiz enlarged it to accommodate more worshipers. It was originally supplied with water from Solomon's Pools near Bethlehem.


Between 1858 and 1860 Haag travelled extensively in the Middle East. In April 1859, he visited Jerusalem. Despite the gradual emergence of a tourist trade in the mid-nineteenth century, it was almost impossible for any Western visitor to gain entry to most religious monuments. However, at the special request of Queen Victoria, the Pasha of Egypt granted Haag permission to paint the Dome of Rock, which the artist reproduced multiple times, including in some exquisite watercolours made in situ of its interior.

Important Works from the Najd Collection
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