View full screen - View 1 of Lot 56. HELEN FRANKENTHALER | LOT'S WIFE (H. 32).
56

HELEN FRANKENTHALER | LOT'S WIFE (H. 32)

Estimate:

50,000

to
- 70,000 USD

HELEN FRANKENTHALER | LOT'S WIFE (H. 32)

HELEN FRANKENTHALER | LOT'S WIFE (H. 32)

Estimate:

50,000

to
- 70,000 USD

Lot sold:

75,000

USD

HELEN FRANKENTHALER

1928 - 2011

LOT'S WIFE (H. 32)


Lithograph printed in colors with extensive handcoloring on three sheets, 1971-76, signed in pencil and dated on the third sheet, inscribed 'Lot's Wife w. crayon and paint' on the first sheet, one of two impressions with hand additions in crayon and paint aside from the numbered edition of 17, on Japanese handmade paper, each framed

overall approx.: 920 by 3492 mm 36¼ by 137½ in

The full sheets, in good condition except the sheets with slight undulation, occasional minor creases and a few tiny fox marks.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

When Frankenthaler reviewed her archives with Universal Limited Art Editions beginning in 1976, she discovered two complete color trial proofs for Lot's Wife. After adding to the images with crayon and paint she signed them in the horizontal format and they were commercially released. (See Harrison p. 147)


'I did Lot's Wife in one shot. I went back to do something to it and then I thought, no, don't turn back, don't look at it, leave it, it's good. That's why I called it Lot's Wife, because she turned and became a pillar of salt. This is a sort of pillar of salt on the left of it.' - The artist, quoted in Judith Goldman, "Painting in Another Language," Artnews 74, no. 7 (September 197), p. 30