EDVARD MUNCH | TWO HUMAN BEINGS. THE LONELY ONES (SCHIEFLER 133; WOLL 157)
EDVARD MUNCH | TWO HUMAN BEINGS. THE LONELY ONES (SCHIEFLER 133; WOLL 157)
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Property from the Collection of Catherine Woodard & Nelson Blitz, Jr.

EDVARD MUNCH | TWO HUMAN BEINGS. THE LONELY ONES (SCHIEFLER 133; WOLL 157)

Estimate: 700,000 - 900,000 USD

Property from the Collection of Catherine Woodard & Nelson Blitz, Jr.

EDVARD MUNCH | TWO HUMAN BEINGS. THE LONELY ONES (SCHIEFLER 133; WOLL 157)

Estimate: 700,000 - 900,000 USD

Lot Sold:1,460,000USD

Lot Details

Description

Property from the Collection of Catherine Woodard & Nelson Blitz, Jr.


EDVARD MUNCH

1863 - 1944

TWO HUMAN BEINGS. THE LONELY ONES (SCHIEFLER 133; WOLL 157) 


Woodcut printed in teal and black, 1899, Woll's I.1 of VIII, an early impression before the crack in the block above the woman's head, signed in pencil, on laid Japan paper, printed by Lassally, framed

image: 395 by 548 mm 15½ by 21⅝ in

sheet: 453 by 584 mm 17⅞ by 23 in

Condition Report

With full margins, the print is in good condition. (Traces of pale discoloration in the margins.)


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Cataloguing

Exhibited

New York, National Academy of Design, Edvard Munch and Harald Sohlberg: Landscapes of the Mind, 1995-96

Greenwich, Connecticut, Bruce Museum, Love, Isolation and Darkness: The Art of Edvard Munch, 1996-97

Catalogue Note

Two figures stand on the Åsgårdstrand shore, looking very much together, yet alone. Their emotional void rivals the expanse of the vast blue waters ahead, with the long-haired woman oblivious to her partner’s implied gaze. In creating this mysterious scenario, Munch divided his woodblock into thirds, treating each piece individually. The ocean and the woman were worked separately, while the man is joined to the shore. Physically anchored to the foreground, he will never be able to reach his partner. Materially and symbolically, she is isolated from the other components of the composition, truly lost in her own world. 


This early, clear impression of one of Munch’s most celebrated printed subjects is a rarity. The inventive draftsman, who continually reimagined and revised his prints, later added work to the rocky foreground. Through much repeated use over many years, the woodblocks began to wear, with a fine diagonal crack appearing over the man’s shoulders and a cut extending to the woman’s head. This preliminary impression best conveys the painter-printmaker’s original intent and enhances our understanding of his ever-evolving printmaking process.

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