A LACQUER SUZURIBAKO [WRITING BOX] WITH LANDSCAPES, ATTRIBUTED TO THE IGARASHI SCHOOL, EDO PERIOD, 17TH CENTURY
 A LACQUER SUZURIBAKO [WRITING BOX] WITH LANDSCAPES, ATTRIBUTED TO THE IGARASHI SCHOOL, EDO PERIOD, 17TH CENTURY
 A LACQUER SUZURIBAKO [WRITING BOX] WITH LANDSCAPES, ATTRIBUTED TO THE IGARASHI SCHOOL, EDO PERIOD, 17TH CENTURY
 A LACQUER SUZURIBAKO [WRITING BOX] WITH LANDSCAPES, ATTRIBUTED TO THE IGARASHI SCHOOL, EDO PERIOD, 17TH CENTURY
 A LACQUER SUZURIBAKO [WRITING BOX] WITH LANDSCAPES, ATTRIBUTED TO THE IGARASHI SCHOOL, EDO PERIOD, 17TH CENTURY
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A LACQUER SUZURIBAKO [WRITING BOX] WITH LANDSCAPES, ATTRIBUTED TO THE IGARASHI SCHOOL, EDO PERIOD, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 20,000 - 30,000 GBP

A LACQUER SUZURIBAKO [WRITING BOX] WITH LANDSCAPES, ATTRIBUTED TO THE IGARASHI SCHOOL, EDO PERIOD, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 20,000 - 30,000 GBP

Lot Sold:40,000GBP

Lot Details

Description

A LACQUER SUZURIBAKO [WRITING BOX] WITH LANDSCAPES, ATTRIBUTED TO THE IGARASHI SCHOOL, EDO PERIOD, 17TH CENTURY


the rectangular writing box with overhanging cover, finely decorated in gold, silver and black hiramaki-e, takamaki-e and hirame on a black ground and inlaid in gold foil with a scene of a fishing village beneath a silvery moon, the interior of the cover a lakeside landscape, the waterdropper in copper gilt depicting geese, rectangular slate inkstone with fundame edge, silver rims 

23 x 24.5 cm., 9 x 9¼ in.

Condition Report

- Overall this suzuribako is in good condition.

- However, there are some slight marks to the top left-hand corner, which only show in certain light.

- The photograph does not show clearly the gold foil, which is in a number of windows of the houses. A few pieces of the gold foil are slightly worn.

- The interior is in fine condition.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

The first Igarashi Doho moved, together with his adopted son Doho II, and pupil, Shimizu Kyubei, from Kyoto, his native city, to Kanazawa in Kaga at the behest of Maeda Toshitsune, daimyo of the province in around 1700. Doho was the son of Igarashi Hosai and a descendant of Shinsai (c.1407-90), the founder of the school. Igarashi Doho developed a unique combination of black lacquer coating with extensive use of gold and silver leaf, flecks, and even nuggets of gold and silver. The elegance of this type of lacquerware appealed to the aristocratic nature of the samurai culture. After the fame of Igarashi lacquer was established in Kanazawa (it became known as Kaga-maki-e), Doho returned to Kyoto, where he died in 1678. Neither of the first two Doho masters signed their work. For two suzuribako by Doho I see Tokyo National Museum, Special Exhibition Oriental Lacquer Arts (Tokyo, 1977), no. 301 and 302.


For a similar example of the first Igarashi Doho School, see the exhibition catalogue of the Tokyo National Museum, Igarashi-ha no makie [Maki-e Lacquer of the Igarashi School], (Tokyo, 2004), p. 11, pl. 3.

Fine Japanese Art
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