View full screen - View 1 of Lot 182. FREUD, SIGMUND | Three postcards and one calling card from Sigmund Freud to the distinguished Hungarian psychoanalyst, Sandor Radó, an original disciple of Freud's, and one of the founding fathers of American psychoanalytics  .
182

FREUD, SIGMUND | Three postcards and one calling card from Sigmund Freud to the distinguished Hungarian psychoanalyst, Sandor Radó, an original disciple of Freud's, and one of the founding fathers of American psychoanalytics

Estimate:

3,000

to
- 5,000 USD

FREUD, SIGMUND | Three postcards and one calling card from Sigmund Freud to the distinguished Hungarian psychoanalyst, Sandor Radó, an original disciple of Freud's, and one of the founding fathers of American psychoanalytics

FREUD, SIGMUND | Three postcards and one calling card from Sigmund Freud to the distinguished Hungarian psychoanalyst, Sandor Radó, an original disciple of Freud's, and one of the founding fathers of American psychoanalytics

Estimate:

3,000

to
- 5,000 USD

Lot sold:

6,250

USD

FREUD, SIGMUND

Three postcards and one calling card from Sigmund Freud to the distinguished Hungarian psychoanalyst, Sandor Radó, an original disciple of Freud's, and one of the founding fathers of American psychoanalytics  


3 autograph postcards signed ("Freud"), written recto and verso in German (approximately 5 7/8 x in.; 149 mm), dated between 1921 and 1933; minor toning and soiling. With 1 calling card with notation in Freud's hand (4 1/8 x 2 7/16 in.; 105 x 62 mm) and accompanying envelope.


A set of postcards from Freud to his friend and the leader of the psychoanalytic movement in the United States, Sandor Radó


Sandor Radó (born in Hungary in 1890), was completing a doctorate in political science when he came across a paper by Sandor Ferenczi, one of Freud's leading proponents in Budapest. The paper in question, “Analysis of the Soul,” argued that the then emerging field of psychoanalysis could provide the answer to many of the questions surrounding why people behave in the manner they do. Following this discovery, Radó read every one of Freud's publications, and was determined to become a doctor, specializing in psychoanalysis, of course. 


In 1913 Radó was appointed secretary of the Hungarian Psychoanalytic Society, and by 1926 Freud had named Radó editor of Zeitschrift and Imago. From 1926 to 1930 he served as secretary to the German Psychoanalytic Society, but as Nazism gathered strength, Radó felt that the looming war posed a threat to the future of psychoanalysis. He believed that many of the field's leading practitioners would be killed, and their papers and manuscripts subsequently destroyed.


Radó fled to New York in 1931, and many European analysts followed him, forming a large community that led to the rapid growth of Freudian and related schools of psychiatry in the U.S. In fact, Radó went on to organize the New York Psychoanalytical Institute on the Berlin model. Because of his leadership at the Institute, in 1944 Radó won the approval of Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons to establish a graduate school of psychoanalysis, marking the first time psychoanalysis was taught in a university in the United States.


His considerable professional achievements aside, Radó was connected to Freud in a far more personal capacity. Radó was married to Elie Révész, a student of Freud's in the 1910s. Once she qualified as a psychoanalyst—one of the so called "First generation"—Révész analyzed Sandor Radó. When Elie died in 1923, Freud wrote a surprisingly personal letter to Radó, expressing his sympathies: "I am totally devastated...while a student of mine, your wife had been particularly dear to me... Who is taking care of your little daughter? That sweet darling at her tender age being robbed of her mother's protection left to cope in this cruel world." The present postcards and calling card—though necessarily brief—are also indicative of this familiarity, with Freud writing "Many thanks, belated, For your birthday wishes," and "Dear Doctor, I will be happy to welcome you."


A striking collections of postcards, from the the father of psychoanalysis to one of his most influential disciples 

Condition as described in catalogue entry.


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