MITCH EPSTEIN | AMOS COAL POWER PLANT, RAYMOND CITY, WEST VIRGINIA, 2004 (FROM AMERICAN POWER)
MITCH EPSTEIN | AMOS COAL POWER PLANT, RAYMOND CITY, WEST VIRGINIA, 2004 (FROM AMERICAN POWER)
52

MITCH EPSTEIN | AMOS COAL POWER PLANT, RAYMOND CITY, WEST VIRGINIA, 2004 (FROM AMERICAN POWER)

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 USD

MITCH EPSTEIN | AMOS COAL POWER PLANT, RAYMOND CITY, WEST VIRGINIA, 2004 (FROM AMERICAN POWER)

Estimate: 30,000 - 50,000 USD

Lot Details

Description

MITCH EPSTEIN

B. 1952

AMOS COAL POWER PLANT, RAYMOND CITY, WEST VIRGINIA, 2004 (FROM AMERICAN POWER)


mural-sized chromogenic print, mounted, framed, a Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York, label on the reverse, 2004, no. 4 in an edition of 4

70 by 92 in. (177.8 by 233.7 cm.)


Condition Report

While this mural-sized chromogenic print has not been examined unframed, it appears to be in generally excellent condition. The colors remain rich and saturated, with no sign of fading.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Cataloguing

Literature

Mitch Epstein, American Power (Göttingen, 2009), pl. 1

Catalogue Note

For these two photographs (also see lot 53), two of the most widely reproduced images from Mitch Epstein’s American Power series, reveal the complexities of the American relationship with power production and how Big Energy influences our communities and individual spaces. Coming out of the documentary tradition, Epstein’s five-year undertaking sheds light on our unwavering reliance on natural resources. By photographing the massive production structures that exist near homes and communities, he wittily reveals our interactions (or lack thereof) with those giant, ever-active engines that provide us with the power we often take for granted.

Contemporary Photographs
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