View full screen - View 1 of Lot 516. ELIZABETH PEYTON | ROE.
516

ELIZABETH PEYTON | ROE

Guaranteed Property

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 USD

ELIZABETH PEYTON | ROE

ELIZABETH PEYTON | ROE

Estimate:

12,000

to
- 18,000 USD

Lot sold:

32,500

USD

The History of Now: The Collection of David Teiger Sold to Benefit Teiger Foundation for the Support of Contemporary Art


ELIZABETH PEYTON

b.1965

ROE


signed, titled and dated 1999 on the reverse

colored pencil on paper

Sheet: 8¾ by 6 in. (22.2 by 15.3 cm.)

Framed: 16½ by 13½ in. (42 by 34.3 cm.)

This work is in very good condition overall. There are stray media marks along the edges. The upper edge is slightly uneven, visible upon close inspection. Framed under Plexiglas.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

Since the early 1990s, Elizabeth Peyton’s subjects have encompassed historical personae, cultural icons and people known to the artist. Blurring the lines between lived experience, memory and imagination, her paintings employ a range of marks and gestures to convey her emotional responses to given subjects. Peyton has described the impetus driving her practice as about capturing the poignancy or potential of a moment: “There are different moments that I’m interested in. But I think it is such an amazing moment when people realize what they are and what they can be, and they start putting themselves out into the world. I think you can see it in people when it’s happening. They look different” (Elizabeth Peyton in conversation with Jarvis Cocker in Interview Magazine, November 26, 2008, online).


Roe is an intimate sketch of one of Peyton’s familiars, whom she tenderly portrays with an economy of line that deftly belies her great skill. The sitter is seemingly unaware of our presence as he pensively gazes off to the side. Peyton is considered one of the preeminent figurative artists of her generation, and she has had her works shown at Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco; and Palais de Tokyo, Tokyo.