LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]
LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]
LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]
LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]
LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]
LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]
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LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]

Estimate: 7,000 - 9,000 USD

LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]

Estimate: 7,000 - 9,000 USD

Lot sold:6,875USD
(10 bids, reserve met)

Description

By Women For Tomorrow's Women: A Benefit Auction For Miss Porter's School


LOUISE BOURGEOIS

1911 - 2010

HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]


each signed with the artist's initials and numbered 24/25 

lithograph and letterpress on paper, in 2 parts 

Each sheet: 12 by 7 in. (30.4 by 43.1 cm.)

Executed in 1999, this work is number 24 from an edition of 25, plus 2 artist's proofs.

Condition Report

This work is in excellent condition overall. The edges are deckled. All elements are present and stable. Framed under Plexiglas.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

Provenance

Courtesy of the Louise Bourgeois Studio 

Catalogue Note

Louise Bourgeois was born in 1911 in Paris, France, and was raised by two parents who ran a tapestry restoration business. She is best known for her large-scale sculptures and installations, although she was also a prolific painter and printmaker. Over the course of her long career, she explored a variety of themes, mostly personal, including domestic violence, sexual desire and the body. After graduating from the Sorbonne in 1953, Bourgeois studied art first at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and the Ecole du Louvre, followed by the Académie Julian, and Atelier Fernand Léger. In 1938, Bourgeois emigrated to New York City with her husband, Robert Goldwater, where she studied painting and lithography at The Art Students League of New York. She became an American citizen in 1951 and soon after joined the American Abstract Artists Group, which included Barnett Newman and Al Reinhardt, among others. As a member of this group, Bourgeois began to work in various mediums, including marble, plaster and bronze, and to investigate her fears and vulnerability. In the 1970s she began teaching at the Pratt Institute, The Cooper Union, Brooklyn College, New York School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture, and the School of Visual Arts. In 1978 she was commissioned by the General Services Administration to create Facets, her first public sculpture. In 1982, The Museum of Modern held the first retrospective exhibit of her work, and in 2000 her work was included in the opening exhibit of Tate Modern in London. She created the monumental work entitled, Maman, made of steel and marble and over nine meters high for the opening of Tate Modern as part of the commission for the Turbine Hall. The Maman series, begun in the 1990’s and continued until her death, focuses on the theme of motherhood, which was central to Bourgeois’s oeuvre.


Bourgeois was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 1997, created by the United States Congress in 1984 to honor artists. She was also awarded the Golden Lion in 1999 at the Venice Biennale, and in 2009, she entered into the National Women’s Hall of Fame. Bourgeois died in New York in 2012 at the age of 99.

LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]
LOUISE BOURGEOIS | HAS THE DAY INVADED THE NIGHT (FROM WHAT IS THE SHAPE OF THIS PROBLEM?) [IN 2 PARTS]
Lot Closed