View full screen - View 1 of Lot 145. JEAN DUBUFFET | CHAMEAU ENTRAVÉ AU DÉSERT [CAMEL TIED UP IN THE DESERT].
145

JEAN DUBUFFET | CHAMEAU ENTRAVÉ AU DÉSERT [CAMEL TIED UP IN THE DESERT]

JEAN DUBUFFET | CHAMEAU ENTRAVÉ AU DÉSERT [CAMEL TIED UP IN THE DESERT]

JEAN DUBUFFET | CHAMEAU ENTRAVÉ AU DÉSERT [CAMEL TIED UP IN THE DESERT]

JEAN DUBUFFET

1901 - 1985

CHAMEAU ENTRAVÉ AU DÉSERT [CAMEL TIED UP IN THE DESERT]


signed and dated 48

pastel and crayon on paper

Sheet: 10⅛ by 13½ in. (25.7 by 34.3 cm.)

Framed: 18¾ by 22⅛ in. (47.5 by 56.2 cm.)


PROVENANCE

Richard Feigen Gallery, Chicago

Sotheby Parke Bernet, 18 May 1972, Lot 5

Waddington Gallery, London

Sotheby's New York, 4 November 1994

Acquired at the above sale by the present owner


LITERATURE

Max Loreau, Ed., Catalogue des travaux de Jean Dubuffet: Fascicule IV, Roses d'Allah, clowns du désert, Lausanne 1967, cat. no. 165, p. 94, illustrated

This work is in very good condition overall. The upper edge is deckled. There are artist pinholes in each corner. There is a slight undulation to the sheet. There is a 2 inch loss to the paper at the upper edge, potentially inherent to the artist's chosen media. There is a ¾ inch tear at the upper edge which has been stabilized, visible upon close inspection. There is discoloration to the sheet. There is stray ink to the right edge, presumably inherent to the artist's working method. There appear to be minor areas of oil staining directly beneath the camel, visible upon close inspection. Framed under Plexiglas.


The lot is sold in the condition it is in at the time of sale. The condition report is provided to assist you with assessing the condition of the lot and is for guidance only. Any reference to condition in the condition report for the lot does not amount to a full description of condition. The images of the lot form part of the condition report for the lot provided by Sotheby's. Certain images of the lot provided online may not accurately reflect the actual condition of the lot. In particular, the online images may represent colours and shades which are different to the lot's actual colour and shades. The condition report for the lot may make reference to particular imperfections of the lot but you should note that the lot may have other faults not expressly referred to in the condition report for the lot or shown in the online images of the lot. The condition report may not refer to all faults, restoration, alteration or adaptation because Sotheby's is not a professional conservator or restorer but rather the condition report is a statement of opinion genuinely held by Sotheby's. For that reason, Sotheby's condition report is not an alternative to taking your own professional advice regarding the condition of the lot.

Richard Feigen Gallery, Chicago

Sotheby Parke Bernet, 18 May 1972, Lot 5

Waddington Gallery, London

Sotheby's New York, 4 November 1994

Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Max Loreau, Ed., Catalogue des travaux de Jean Dubuffet: Fascicule IV, Roses d'Allah, clowns du désert, Lausanne 1967, cat. no. 165, p. 94, illustrated

Born in Le Havre in 1901, Jean Dubuffet is widely regarded as one of the most important artists of the 20th century. He was born into a winemaking family before dedicating himself to a creative practice in the visual arts. In the 1940s Dubuffet began mixing various materials including mud, sand, pebbles, glass string and other materials into oil paint, creating a thick paste, which he then applied with a spatula to carve and cut lines into the textured surface of his canvases. His experimentation with various media would become one of the most celebrated components of his paintings. The painter is primarily known today as the founder of the Art brut movement, which cultivated his interest for “low art” and highlighted marginalized figures such as children, the mentally ill and the outcast. 


The present work is from the body of work Dubuffet produced while in Algeria. Dubuffet initially went to Alger and visited the Sahara in February 1947 before returning in November of that year to spend six months in El Golea, returning again in 1949. Dubuffet’s work from the period frequently depicts camels and dromedaries, gazelles and palm trees, as well as portraits of locals and their activities.


Jean Dubuffet’s work has been exhibited around the world, and is included in the collections of many of the world’s most respected museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Tate Modern in London and the Centre Pompidou in Paris, among many others.