TWO GOLD ENAMELLED PENDANTS, NORTH INDIA, 19TH CENTURY
TWO GOLD ENAMELLED PENDANTS, NORTH INDIA, 19TH CENTURY
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TWO GOLD ENAMELLED PENDANTS, NORTH INDIA, 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 2,000 - 3,000 GBP

TWO GOLD ENAMELLED PENDANTS, NORTH INDIA, 19TH CENTURY

Estimate: 2,000 - 3,000 GBP

Lot Sold:2,500GBP

Lot Details

Description

TWO GOLD ENAMELLED PENDANTS, NORTH INDIA, 19TH CENTURY


both in polychrome enamels, one depicting a nobleman with floral bouquet, the other a Vishnupada depicting the footprints of the deity


(2)


3.3 by 2.7cm; 2.8 by 2.8cm.

Condition Report

Both in good condition, the square pendant depicting a nobleman missing reverse, with old collector's label "393", the other pendant with footprints with some rubbing to enamel, small break at terminal, as viewed.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

Oppi Untracht outlines the significance of the sacred, side-by-side footprint amulets in India: "It came into use for worship among Hindus and Buddhists to symbolize the deity's presence. Several Hindu gods, and Buddha, have been and are represented by such a symbol. Carved in stone, or formed in metal, the footprints depict what appears to be an impression of the soles of the standing deity's feet, upon which appear several symbols, all with specific reference to that deity". A similar example is in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (O. Untracht, Traditional Jewellery of India, London, 1997, p.107, no.177).  

Arts of the Islamic World
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