AN IZNIK POTTERY TILE WITH FLORAL VASE, TURKEY, 17TH CENTURY
AN IZNIK POTTERY TILE WITH FLORAL VASE, TURKEY, 17TH CENTURY
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AN IZNIK POTTERY TILE WITH FLORAL VASE, TURKEY, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 5,000 - 7,000 GBP

AN IZNIK POTTERY TILE WITH FLORAL VASE, TURKEY, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 5,000 - 7,000 GBP

Lot Details

Description

AN IZNIK POTTERY TILE WITH FLORAL VASE, TURKEY, 17TH CENTURY


decorated in underglaze cobalt blue, green and turquoise with a central vase from which emanate carnations and tulips with cloudband stem, between two cypress trees


25.3 by 25.4cm.

Condition Report

Intact, the edges with abrasion and small chips, with hairline scratches to surface glaze particularly at edges, as viewed.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

This tile belongs to a group from the later Iznik period, some of which were made for export to Egypt, notably similar examples in the Aqsunqur Mosque ("Blue Mosque"), Cairo, originally built in 1347 and restored under the Ottomans in 1652. John Carswell notes: "Characteristic of this period are single tiles with a symmetrical spray of carnations and other flowers in a vase. Lacking sufficient orders from the court, the potters turned elsewhere, and it is significant that by the mid-century large quantities of tiles were exported to Egypt" (Carswell 1998, pp.106-7). Further tiles from this group are in the British Museum, London, inv. no. OA+.10771.1-4, which entered the museum collection in the second half of the nineteenth century. 

Arts of the Islamic World
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