A SAFAVID BLUE AND WHITE POTTERY DISH DEPICTING A LION, PERSIA, 17TH CENTURY
A SAFAVID BLUE AND WHITE POTTERY DISH DEPICTING A LION, PERSIA, 17TH CENTURY
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A SAFAVID BLUE AND WHITE POTTERY DISH DEPICTING A LION, PERSIA, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 8,000 - 12,000 GBP

A SAFAVID BLUE AND WHITE POTTERY DISH DEPICTING A LION, PERSIA, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 8,000 - 12,000 GBP

Lot Sold:11,250GBP

Lot Details

Description

A SAFAVID BLUE AND WHITE POTTERY DISH DEPICTING A LION, PERSIA, 17TH CENTURY


the stonepaste body of circular form with bracketed rim and cavetto moulded in relief with petalled design, painted in underglaze cobalt blue with black outlines and details featuring a large roundel with a stylised lion walking within a lush vegetal landscape, the reverse with a band of overlapping scale lappets rising from the footring enclosing a pseudo-Chinese mark


29cm. diam. 

Condition Report

The dish once broken and restored as visible by the metal staples used along the visible hairline crack, some associated overpainting, minor abrasion to rim, as viewed.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

This striking dish is a fine example from a group incorporating a lionine form within differing decorative fields. Ultimately inspired by imported Chinese Ming period porcelain wares, they introduce a more patterned approach to the design, taking the Chinese naturalistic elements and transforming them into decorative patterns (see Crowe 2002, pp.117-121). A closely related example is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, inv.no. 24.47.4. Attributed to probably Mashhad, circa 1635, the dish in the Metropolitan Museum features two fighting lions within an almost surrealist landscape as in the present example. Another model in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, is catalogued as a 'Dish with Chinese lion dog' alluding to the combination of forms inspired to create these lionine models (inv.no. EA1978.1784).

Arts of the Islamic World
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