A BRONZE CAST SCULPTURE DEPICTING TWO MYTHICAL ANIMALS IN COMBAT, INDIA, DECCAN, BIJAPUR OR GOLCONDA, 17TH CENTURY
A BRONZE CAST SCULPTURE DEPICTING TWO MYTHICAL ANIMALS IN COMBAT, INDIA, DECCAN, BIJAPUR OR GOLCONDA, 17TH CENTURY
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A BRONZE CAST SCULPTURE DEPICTING TWO MYTHICAL ANIMALS IN COMBAT, INDIA, DECCAN, BIJAPUR OR GOLCONDA, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 10,000 - 15,000 GBP

A BRONZE CAST SCULPTURE DEPICTING TWO MYTHICAL ANIMALS IN COMBAT, INDIA, DECCAN, BIJAPUR OR GOLCONDA, 17TH CENTURY

Estimate: 10,000 - 15,000 GBP

Lot Details

Description

A BRONZE CAST SCULPTURE DEPICTING TWO MYTHICAL ANIMALS IN COMBAT, INDIA, DECCAN, BIJAPUR OR GOLCONDA, 17TH CENTURY


cast and chased bronze gilt sculpture portraying a yali (horned lion) grasping a simurgh (phoenix) in its jaws, standing on a rectangular platform


9 by 9 by 4cm. 

Condition Report

Most of the gilding rubbed, the surface with some abrasion as consistent with age and use, the platform on which the sculpture stands with some slight dents, as viewed.


"In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective, qualified opinion. Prospective buyers should also refer to any Important Notices regarding this sale, which are printed in the Sale Catalogue.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS PRINTED IN THE SALE CATALOGUE."

Cataloguing

Catalogue Note

The present lot is part of a wider corpus of metal zoomorphic objects from the Deccan. This sculpture is comparable to that published in Haidar and Sardar 2015, p.206, cat.no. 99. Haidar and Sardar, following Mark Zebrowski, attributed the piece to Golconda due to postural parallels with contemporaneous depictions of animals in combat, specifically the yali with one raised paw and elephant with a rearing trunk on a relief wall carving near the Patancheru Gate (Darwaza) of circa 1559 in Golconda. Another granite relief from this monument is illustrated in Zebrowski 1997, p.103, p.112. The yali motif is not restricted to Golconda but seen throughout the Deccan, as evidenced by the plaster wall relief of a yali with one raised paw in a sixteenth-century plaster architectural frieze shown by Zebrowksi 1997 on p.103, pl.108.


Another famous example is the gilt-copper dagger hilt from the Stuart Cary Welch collection, sold in these rooms, 6 April 2011, lot 103. This is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (inv.no. 2011.236). Two swords with related but simpler imagery are in the British Museum and the Government Museum, Bikaner, as published in Zebrowski 1997, p.102, pl.107. See also Stuart Cary Welch, India: Art and Culture 1300-1900, 1985, p.48, cat.no.17.

Arts of the Islamic World
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