NAYARIT SEATED MALE FIGURE, IXTLÁN DEL RIO STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250
NAYARIT SEATED MALE FIGURE, IXTLÁN DEL RIO STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250
NAYARIT SEATED MALE FIGURE, IXTLÁN DEL RIO STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250
161

NAYARIT SEATED MALE FIGURE, IXTLÁN DEL RIO STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250

Estimate: 15,000 - 25,000 USD

NAYARIT SEATED MALE FIGURE, IXTLÁN DEL RIO STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250

Estimate: 15,000 - 25,000 USD

Lot Sold:12,500USD

Lot Details

Description

Property from an American Private Collection

NAYARIT SEATED MALE FIGURE, IXTLÁN DEL RIO STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250


Height: 13 ½ in (34.4 cm)

Condition Report

Very good overall condition. No obvious breaks and repairs. Consistent pigment and coloring details overall. Nice areas of black manganese on the face and body.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.


Cataloguing

Provenance

D. Daniel Michel, acquired in 1957 (inventory no. 57:024)

Ancient Art of the New World, New York, acquired from the above

American Private Collection, acquired in 1991


PUBLISHED

Alan Wardwell, Primitive Art in Chicago Collections, Chicago, 1960, cat. no. 27

Exhibited

The Art Institute of Chicago, 1959, temporary loan from D. Daniel Michel 

The Art Institute of Chicago, Primitive Art in Chicago Collections, November 16, 1960-January 2, 1961 

Catalogue Note

The highly decorated and evocative figure is in mourning, shown by the scarified cheeks from the ritual of cheek-piercing and his slender taut body from fasting, showing his ribcage and spine. Townsend identified the vertical incisions of cheek-piercing as one of the expressions of mourning associated with funerary ceremonies. Townsend notes "During mourning the living and the deceased constitute a special group temporarily suspended between the worlds of the living and the dead. In some cases, this phase invokes the ritual cutting of hair, inflicting wounds, and the use of some professional mourners." (Townsend, "Before Gods, Before Kings",  in Townsend, ed. Ancient West Mexico, Art and Archaeology of the Unknown Past, 1998, p. 133). 

Art of Africa, Oceania and the Americas
Online bidding closed