View full screen - View 1 of Lot 156. JALISCO SEATED FEMALE WITH INFANT, AMECA-ETZATLÁN STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250.
156

JALISCO SEATED FEMALE WITH INFANT, AMECA-ETZATLÁN STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250

Estimate:

35,000

to
- 45,000 USD

JALISCO SEATED FEMALE WITH INFANT, AMECA-ETZATLÁN STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250

JALISCO SEATED FEMALE WITH INFANT, AMECA-ETZATLÁN STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250

Estimate:

35,000

to
- 45,000 USD

Property from an American Private Collection

JALISCO SEATED FEMALE WITH INFANT, AMECA-ETZATLÁN STYLE PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 100 BC-AD 250


Height: 17 in (43.2 cm)

In excellent condition overall, with fine details on the facial features and body ornaments. Does appear to have a pressure crack on the proper left side of the back under the shoulder. Very good irregular root marks visible on the face and body. Two beads of the proper right armband missing.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.


Davis Art Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College, May 14, 1999-February 12, 2003, long term loan from Herbert L. Lucas

The proud and stylized maternity figures of the Ameca style were important ancient societal figures in West Mexican art. As Townsend notes, ceramic effigies formally displayed status to other spirits of the afterlife, the figures "achieved the appropriate rank and status to hold important ritual functions in life, and that they were therefore entitled to exercise these functions in the afterlife" (Townsend, in Townsend, ed. Ancient West Mexico, The Art and Archaeology of the Unknown Past, Chicago, 1998, p. 135). Ancestral pairs or marital couples are a well known type, but this particular Ameca-Etzatlán maternity style includes individual women representing lineage and kinship status. 

Here the youthful woman holds her young child to her breast, where even the child is depicted at a mature age, wearing a similar headdress to the mother. Sitting erectly with high rounded shoulders she wears beaded armbands, a close-fitting skirt and tall turban secured with a beaded headband. Her face is of classic elongated form with a sharply defined jawline, slender nose, sculpted cheeks and parted and darkened lips showing carefully modeled teeth. Facial paint provides additional ornamentation but was a recognized status marker, here her eyes are framed within the tapered blacked eye masks.  


The strong similarity amongst a small group of Ameca female figures suggests they may be from a single workshop; see Berjonneau, Sonnery and Deletaille, eds., Rediscovered Masterpieces of Mesoamerica, Boulogne, 1985 Fig. 252.