CHUPÍCUARO EFFIGY VESSEL LATE PRECLASSIC/PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 300 BC-AD 300
CHUPÍCUARO EFFIGY VESSEL LATE PRECLASSIC/PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 300 BC-AD 300
CHUPÍCUARO EFFIGY VESSEL LATE PRECLASSIC/PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 300 BC-AD 300
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CHUPÍCUARO EFFIGY VESSEL LATE PRECLASSIC/PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 300 BC-AD 300

Estimate: 8,000 - 10,000 USD

CHUPÍCUARO EFFIGY VESSEL LATE PRECLASSIC/PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 300 BC-AD 300

Estimate: 8,000 - 10,000 USD

Lot Sold:10,625USD

Lot Details

Description

Property from an American Private Collection

CHUPÍCUARO EFFIGY VESSEL LATE PRECLASSIC/PROTOCLASSIC, CIRCA 300 BC-AD 300


Length: 14 in (35.5 cm)

Condition Report

Overall excellent condition. Nice burnish marks consistently visible along the torso. Minor pressure crack repaired across the underbelly. Some remains of encrustation around the legs. Rear left haunch with a label reading "Laughton"


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.


Cataloguing

Provenance

Charles Laughton and Elsa Lancaster, Los Angeles

Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, October 15, 1966, lot 33, consigned by the above 

Sotheby's, New York, May 16, 1989, lot 88

Merrin Gallery, New York

American Private Collection, acquired from the above in 1989

Catalogue Note

The Chupícuaro culture was centered in the Acámbaro Valley and Lerma River area of Guanajuato, Mexico, from about 600 BC until about AD 200. Its location in northwest Mexico made it a possible route for the exchange of ideas between West Mexico, Central Mexico and the American Southwest. Chupícuaro artisans created a distinctive ceramic tradition best known for the male and female figures with bulbous legs and geometric step-fret motifs on the chest and face. 


This effigy vessel represents a stylized dog whose large ears function as spouts. The tapered and pierced feet are similar to the supports of Chupícuaro mammiform vessels.

Art of Africa, Oceania and the Americas
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