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224

A ROMAN MARBLE TORSO OF A MAN, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY A.D.

VAT reduced rateUK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

60,000

to
- 90,000 GBP

Property from the Estate of Louis Maury, Switzerland

A ROMAN MARBLE TORSO OF A MAN, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY A.D.

A ROMAN MARBLE TORSO OF A MAN, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY A.D.

Estimate:

60,000

to
- 90,000 GBP

Lot sold:

175,000

GBP

Property from the Estate of Louis Maury, Switzerland

A ROMAN MARBLE TORSO OF A MAN, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY A.D.


standing with the weight on his left leg, and wearing a chlamys fastened with a brooch on his left shoulder, the head repaired in antiquity, traces of an attribute on his upper left arm, remains of a support on his left thigh; no restorations.

Height 82 cm.




As shown. Surface worn overall. Small circular hole in neck. Superficial stress crack through proper right buttock.


In response to your inquiry, we are pleased to provide you with a general report of the condition of the property described above. Since we are not professional conservators or restorers, we urge you to consult with a restorer or conservator of your choice who will be better able to provide a detailed, professional report. Prospective buyers should inspect each lot to satisfy themselves as to condition and must understand that any statement made by Sotheby's is merely a subjective qualified opinion.

NOTWITHSTANDING THIS REPORT OR ANY DISCUSSIONS CONCERNING CONDITION OF A LOT, ALL LOTS ARE OFFERED AND SOLD "AS IS" IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONDITIONS OF SALE PRINTED IN THE CATALOGUE.

Hôtel Drouot, Paris, Christian Grandin, commissaire-priseur, February 13th, 1982, no. 198

Louis Maury, Geneva, acquired at the above sale

by descent to the present owners

The statuary composition may have been similar to the Ares Borghese (A. Pasquier and J.-L. Martinez, 100 chefs-d’oeuvre de la sculpture grecque au Louvre, 2007, p. 122f.). The chlamys, which is similar in shape to a Roman paludamentum, is a "decorative" feature added by the sculptor of the Roman Imperial era.