View full screen - View 1 of Lot 27. A FRAGMENTARY ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF THE DIADUMENOS, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY A.D., WITH MID 17TH CENTURY OR EARLIER RESTORATIONS.
27

A FRAGMENTARY ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF THE DIADUMENOS, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY A.D., WITH MID 17TH CENTURY OR EARLIER RESTORATIONS

UK: Greenford Park Warehouse

Estimate:

30,000

to
- 50,000 GBP

A FRAGMENTARY ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF THE DIADUMENOS, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY A.D., WITH MID 17TH CENTURY OR EARLIER RESTORATIONS

A FRAGMENTARY ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF THE DIADUMENOS, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY A.D., WITH MID 17TH CENTURY OR EARLIER RESTORATIONS

Estimate:

30,000

to
- 50,000 GBP

Lot sold:

35,000

GBP

A FRAGMENTARY ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF THE DIADUMENOS, CIRCA 2ND CENTURY A.D., WITH MID 17TH CENTURY OR EARLIER RESTORATIONS


turned to his right, his face with full parted lips and straight nose merging into the prominent brow, his hair radiating from the crown in overlapping curls and bound in a broad fillet falling in rippling folds over the shoulders; quadrangular plinth, shoulders, ends of fillet, and back of head restored, all carved from a single block of marble.


Total height 53 cm.; height of head 26.5 cm.; height of face 17.5 cm.

To request a condition report for this lot, please contact ancientsculpture@sothebys.com.

European private collection, circa 17th Century (based on restorations and Dal Pozzo drawings)

French private collection, Paris, acquired in the 1980s or earlier

Sotheby's, London, June 12th, 2017, no. 22, illus.


Recorded

unpublished 1630s Italian drawings, probably by Pietro Testa (1611–1650), originally part of the Museo Cartaceo ("Paper Museum"), a collection of drawings and prints assembled by the Italian scholar Cassiano dal Pozzo (1588-1657), then in the collection of Sir William Stirling-Maxwell (1818-1878), sold at Philips, London, December 12th, 1990, and recorded in a photograph in the Warburg Institute Library in London

The front part of the head comes from a Roman copy of the Diadumenos by Polykleitos, a famous bronze statue from circa 430/420 B.C., known in numerous copies. For other copies see D. Kreikenbom, Bildwerke nach Polyklet, 1990, pp. 109ff., pls. 247ff. For the original and its interpretation see S. Kansteiner, et al., eds., Der Neue Overbeck, vol. 2, 2014, pp. 467ff, no. 2.